The St. John Genealogy

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Vice Admiral Sir William St. John, Knight

Vice Admiral Sir William St. John, Knight

Male Abt 1561 - 1638  (~ 77 years)

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  • Name William St. John  [1, 2
    Title Vice Admiral 
    Prefix Sir 
    Suffix Knight 
    Born abt. 1561  Uchel-olau (High-light), Gwenfo, Glamorganshire, Wales, Great Britain Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • William St. John in 1595 serving as deputy sheriff.(1) Incorporated in the existing farm buildings are traces of possibly a late medieval house of H-shaped plan that may have replaced an adjacent moated site; fragments of late medieval and 17th-century dressed stone exist loose or reset in later work.

      (1) Clark, Limbus, pp. 553-4; Cardiff Central Library, MS 3.464 (Beauchamp Survey, 1429); ibid, MS 2.1148 (transcript of Glamorgan Plea Rolls).

      Highlight (E), Wenvoe (C).
      ST 0997 6967 46 S.E.
    Gender Male 
    Occupation 29 May 1593  London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Ship Captain.


    I send Captain St. John unto you for his direction and despatch; I pray favour him in it. My Lord Admiral and I this night speaking with him found him very willing to go anywhither that her Majesty should send him and upon any conditions whatsoever. But the charge he shall be at living in that place will be very great, and the entertainment of a captain of 100 foot is small, so as if he have not besides his company some good allowance he doth make an ill bargain, besides the dangers to which he shall expose himself. We did both resolve to join in a letter unto you to move my Lord your father to consider of the gentleman's poor state, unfit to bear such a out some help. My Lord Admiral is gone to bed and fast asleep, and therefore, though I write only, use my lord's name and mine to your father in it.
    Endorsed :??29 May 1593.?
    Seal. 1 p.
    Charles Lord Howard, Lord Admiral, to Sir Robert Cecil.

     
    Title 4 Jan 1594 
    Esquire 
    Occupation 1595  Glamorgan, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Under Sheriff 
    Fact 1 14 Jan 1595  London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Member of Privy Councel 
    • The names of all that have been examined, since the first of January last, and now sent unto the lords of the Privy Council.
      Endorsed by Cecil:Examinations concerning Sir Ch. and Sir H. Danvers. (170. 91.)
      The examinations of the persons named, viz.:
      (1.) Anthony Swaine, one of the soldiers of Calshot Castle : taken before Edward, Earl of Hertford, Sir Thomas West, Knt., and William St. John, Esquire, 4th January 1594.
      View Full Content

      Signed : Hertford. Thomas West. William Seint John.
      Endorsed with a précis of the contents.
      2 pp. (170. 81.)
    • ?The names of all that have been examined, since the first of January last, and now sent unto the lords of the Privy Council.?
      Endorsed by Cecil :??Examinations concerning Sir Ch. and Sir H. Danvers.? (170. 91.)
      The examinations of the persons named, viz.:?
      (1.) Anthony Swaine, one of the soldiers of Calshot Castle : taken before Edward, Earl of Hertford, Sir Thomas West, Knt., and William St. John, Esquire, 4th January 1594.
      Swaine, Kitche and Mandy, soldiers of the Castle, were at Calshot on Monday the 7th of October last, when John Dalamor, the water serjeant, came thither and gave warning to Kitche, the master gunner that there were many suspected persons in the boat that rode between St. Andrews and Calshot, and willed them bend their ordnance against them. Mr. Humminges came on the same morning in a boat to the Castle to the Deputy to know if he had received any letters from the Captain, and presently after, the Deputy went to Hampton, and came not again until Wednesday night, after the coming of the company to the Castle.
      On the 9th, about four of the clock in the afternoon, he heard a shot from St. Andrews Castle, even as a boat came on shore at Calshot Castle, which was of Itchen Ferry, out of the which came four or five persons, whereof the two knights, Sir Charles and Sir Henry Danvers, and Mr. Dymmocke were three. Presently came in another greater boat ten or eleven persons more ashore to the Castle, but he knew none of them. Mr. Dymmocke, presently after his coming, had some speech with Kitche, but what the speech was, he knoweth not; after the speech Kitche took all the said company into the Castle, disarmed them, arrested them and put them all up into the Deputy's chamber, and guarded the Castle with such weapons as there were, until the help came out of the company, which they sent for, viz : John Coles, John Gouldoke, John Hancocke, and Thomas Locke, who came into the Castle within an hour and a half after the said company. The Deputy came from Hampton into the Castle after 5 o'clock the same night, and finding all things as aforesaid, willed the said company to depart, and told them that they in the Castle were the Captain's friends, and were going into Brittany for service, and that he would keep the said help harmless, and keep them from trouble, and see the company in the Castle forthcoming. And the knights, Dymmocke, and the Deputy, with the rest of the company, did sup in the Deputy's Chamber, with such victuals as they brought with them, viz.: beef, mutton, and cold pasty of venison, and this examinate going and coming amongst them, did perceive the said knights to be very sad. He remembered that Roger Fynche, the porter, came from Hampton the 10th of October, and went back again that night. During their being in the Castle, the lesser knight, whose name was Sir Charles Danvers, as he thinketh, was hurt in one of his hands, and he saw one of their men, a surgeon, being a little man and young, on the said Thursday night dress the said knight's hurt. He saw not any of the company on Friday till towards night that they departed from the Castle, which was about 4 of the clock in the afternoon, and was presently on the coming of one Gilbert, a Scottishman, in a boat that came from Hamble. Their departure was very sudden; Mr. Dymmocke went with them also, but Gilbert went not with them because the boat was overloaden, who went overland from thence. They went into the boat in such haste that they were like to sink it. The said Gilbert told him that one Mr. Payne, a man of my lord of Southampton's, at such time as Gilbert took boat to come towards Calshot willed him to tell the knights that they should presently be gone and shift for themselves or else they would be apprehended that night, upon which message delivered they all departed suddenly, in a great hurly burly.
      Signed : Hertford. Thomas West. William Seint John.
      Endorsed with a précis of the contents.
      2 pp. (170. 81.)
    Census 1607  Jamestown, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Member of Jamestown Colony 
    MILI 21 Dec 1607  Dublin, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Knighted 
    Fact 1 7 Aug 1608 
    Sir William St John to the Earl of Nottingham
    Upon the 2nd of this instant my Lord of Ocheltry, his Majesty's Lieutenant, with part of his forces, about 1000 men, arrived at Ila, half a league from the castle of Donawigg, where next morning the Lord Bishop of the Isles was sent ashore to speak with Angus McKonel and his son, who kept the castle. His persuasions succeeded so well that obedience was procured from the rebels, my Lord Lieutenant accepting them in honourable and gentle terms, and came the 5th of this month aboard my ship, bringing Mac Konell and Macllyn, with other gentlemen, to finish celebrating that feast for the preservation of our Sovereign from the treasons of Gowrye, which his Lordship had at dinner begun bountifully on board his own ship. The circumstance of this, as of our hopeful suits, I presume will be related to you by messengers. The respect we receive from the Lord Lieutenant, and our endeavours to advance his Highness's service, have true correspondence; from him as a courteous commander; from us as obedient servants. I have great comfort in the helpful carefulness of Captain Win. From the galley we have no word. The victualler which carries the field pieces is much missed, and will be more if my Lord proceeds, as is intended, to go through the Isles. It is wished that she be hastened away, whereof you have been most careful as in all other your designs.?Aboard the Advantage, 7 August.
    Holograph. Endorsed: "1608." 1 p (195 33.)


    'Cecil Papers: August 1608', in Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 20, 1608, ed. M S Giuseppi and G Dyfnallt Owen (London, 1968), pp. 224-234. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-cecil-papers/vol20/pp224-234 [accessed 10 May 2016]. 
    Occupation 1609  Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Apprehended the pirate, Harris, in Scotland 
    Occupation 1609  London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Captain and Commander of H.M.S. Advantage 
    Occupation 1609  Jamestown, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location 
    signed the 2nd Charter of Virginia 
    Census 1611  Jamestown, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Member of the Jamestown Colony 
    Occupation 1612  Jamestown, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location 
    M.C. of the Virginia Company of London and His Majesties Counsel 
    Occupation 1612  Jamestown, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location 
    signed the 3rd Charter of Virginia 
    Fact 1 12 Mar 1612  Westminster, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    59. Grant by Letters Patent to the Treasurer, Company, and Adventurers of Virginia. Recites Letters Patent of 23 May 1609, [ante No.49] granted at the suit of divers adventurers and planters of the first Colony in Virginia. Now, forasmuch as his Majesty understands that without the compass of said two hundred miles, and yet not far distant from said Colony, there are divers islands uninhabited, some discovered by the industry of said Company, which it may import said Colony to plant, in regard whereof they are suitors to his Majesty to grant an enlargement of said patent, as well for an extent of limits as for other matters concerning the better Government of said Company and Colony. His Majesty, tendering the good success of said plantation and Company, &c., grants to said Treasurer, &c., for ever, all the islands within three hundred leagues of the parts granted to said Treasurer, &c., in said Letters Patent, and being within 41 and 30 deg. N.L. with all lands, waters, minerals, commodities, privileges, &c., whatsoever Provided always that said islands be not possessed by any other Christian Prince or State, or within the bounds of the Northern Colony of Virginia, to enjoy said islands for ever, to be holden of his Majesty, &c. in free and common soccage, yielding the fifth part of gold and silver. And further, his Majesty grants ("that posterity may hereafter know who have adventured, and not been sparing of their purses in such a noble and generous action for the genera good of their country,") that George, Archbishop of Canterbury Gilbert Earl of Shrewsbury, Mary Countess of Shrewsbury (here follows a list of earls, countesses, bishops, lords, knights, and others, occupying 1½ membranes) who since said last Letters Patents have joined with the former adventurers of said Company, shall henceforth be free members of the Company, and shall, according to the proportion of their adventure, enjoy all rights, privileges, profits, &c., in as ample manner as any other adventurers nominated in any former Letters Patents. And his Majesty further grants that Philip Earl of Montgomery, William Lord Paget, Sir John Harrington, Sir Willm. Cavendish, Sir John Sammes (sic), Sir Samuel Sandys, Sir Thomas Freke, Sir William St. John, Sir Richard Grobham, Sir Thomas Dale, Sir Cavalliero Maycott, Richard Martin, John Bingley, Thomas Watson, and Arthure Ingram, whom said Treasurer and Company have nominated, shall be of his Majesty's Council for said first Colony. And his Majesty grants that said Treasurer, &c., shall, once every week or oftener, hold a Court for ordering said plantation, and that any five of said Council (of which the Treasurer or his deputy to be one), and fifteen at least of the generality, shall be a sufficient Court for dispatching casual matters of less weight touching said plantation, and that for the handling of affairs of great importance, as the manner of government, disposing of said possessions, and establishing of trade, there shall be held upon the last Wednesday save one of Hilary, Easter, Trinity, and Michaelmas terms for ever, a General and Solemn Assembly or Court; and the greater number so assembled shall have power to elect persons to be of "Our Council" for said Colony, nominate officers, make laws for the good of said plantation not contrary to the laws of England, and disfranchise from their Company all such as shall refuse or neglect to put in their adventure within six months after same shall be due. And whereas the non-payment of such monies promised in adventure has been found much to have hindered the progress of said plantation, and it seems reasonable that persons neglecting their promise should be compellable to make good the same, his Majesty's pleasure is that in any suits commenced by said Treasurer, &c., against such persons, the Judges both in the Courts of Chancery and Common Law further such suits, so far forth as law and equity will permit. And his Majesty farther grants to said Treasurer, Company, &c. that the greater part of them in General Court assembled, may elect into their Company as well aliens (born in any parts in amity with his Majesty) as natural subjects, who shall enjoy all privileges, profits, &c., to the Company belonging, as amply as any other adventurer; that it shall be lawful for them to transport to said Colony all such of his Majesty's subjects, or strangers that will become his Majesty's subjects, as shall willingly accompany them, with shipping, munition, victuals, merchandize, furniture, beasts, and all other things necessary for plantation, defence, and trade, without yielding any custom or duty for seven years; and that said Treasurer or his deputy or any two others of said Council shall have power to minister the oaths of supremacy and allegiance to all who shall pass to said Colony, and to minister such a formal cath as by them shall be devised to all persons employed touching said plantation, for faithful discharge of their service, also to such persons as they shall think meet for examination in any cause concerning said plantation. And whereas his Majesty has been certified that divers lewd persons having received entertainment from said Company or having contracted to be employed in said plantation, have withdrawn or refused to go thither, and that divers persons employed in said plantations have misbehaved themselves by mutinies, &c., or having been sent abroad by the Governor of Virginia for some discovery or other business, have most treacherously returned to England by stealth, or have been sent hither as misdoers, and having been questioned by Council, have by their insolent carriage shown little respect to the authority to which his Majesty has appointed them, and by most vile and slanderous reports, as well of the country of Virginia as of the government, have done as much as in them lay to bring said plantation into contempt, by means whereof not only the adventurers have been exceedingly abused, and a great number of others discouraged from joining in so noble, christian, and worthy an action, but also the ulter ruin of the same has been greatly endangered. Now, forasmuch as it appears that these abuses have grown in regard said Council have not power by said former Letters Patent to chastize such offenders, his Majesty for reformation of so enormous abuses grants to said Treasurer, &c., that it shall be lawful for any two of said Council (of which said Treasurer or Deputy to be one) to cause to be apprehended every such person as shall misbehave as before mentioned, and upon examination and proof before said Council of such misdemeanors, or upon any insolent carriage to said Council, to bind them over with good security for their good behaviour or remand them back to said Colony to be proceeded against according to the laws in use there. And for the more effectual advancing of said plantation, his Majesty, by the consent of his Privy Council, grants said Treasurer and Company license to publish lotteries, to be held for a whole year, and afterwards they shall have six months warning before his Majesty's pleasure shall be deemed altered, said lotteries to be held within this realm of England, and with such prizes, conditions, &c., as to said Treasurer, &c., shall seem convenient. And it shall be lawful for said Treasurer, &c., to elect receivers and other officers for the governing of said lotteries, and administer oaths to them for their true dealing, and to publish by proclamation said lotteries in all cities, towns, boroughs, thoroughfares, and other places within England. And his Majesty wills all mayors, justices, sheriffs, bailiffs, constables, and other his officers and subjects to be aiding and assisting said lotteries by all lawful means. And his Majesty confirms to said Treasurer, &c., all manner of privileges, &c., granted them in any his Letters Patent, and not in these presents revoked, altered or abridged. 7 membs. [Patent Roll, 9 Jas. I., Part 14.]


    'America and West Indies: Addenda 1612', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 9, 1675-1676 and Addenda 1574-1674, ed. W Noel Sainsbury (London, 1893), pp. 42-47. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/america-west-indies/vol9/pp42-47 [accessed 11 May 2016].
     
    Occupation 1614  Portsmouth, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Burgess of Portsmouth 
    Education 1616  Lincoln's Inn, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Admitted to Lincoln's Inn, one of the four inns of court

    See: http://www.innertemplelibrary.org.uk/temple-history/inner-temple-history.htm 
    Occupation 1616  Uchel-olau (High-light), Gwenfo, Glamorganshire, Wales, Great Britain Find all individuals with events at this location 
    inherited Lordship of Highlight from father. 
    Occupation Mar 1617  London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Captain of the H.M.S. Destiny 
    Occupation 1618  Africa Colony Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Built the first English fort in England's Africa Colony 
    Occupation 1618  Africa Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Member of the African Company 
    Fact 1 29 Mar 1618 
    Illustration facing page 310. The letter of Sir Walter Raleigh runs as follows:—

    Sr William St. Johns. besyds the monie dew to Tite the anker Smith, ther is fifty pound that this bearer Willm : ston hath given bond for to a linnen Draper for shirtts for the companie, I pray yow to speake with Mr Herbert the Pencioner that he will satisfy yt fifty pound out of my Cussen Herberts monie, amp; in the meane while free this poore man who hath bine arrested for it.

    loving frinde.
    W. Ralegh.

    from Lee reddy
    to sett sayle this
    29th of March."


    'Errata and addenda', in Cardiff Records: Volume 2, ed. John Hobson Matthews (Cardiff, 1900), pp. i-iii. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cardiff-records/vol2/i-iii [accessed 11 May 2016]. 
    Occupation 1623  London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Vice Admiral of H.M.S. Adventurer (under Sir Henry Mervyn, Admiral) 
    Fact 1 1624  Westminster, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    In 1624, (excerpts of 9 entries that include his name) he added dye to silk to make it weigh more. Secondly, the dyers had another petition complaining of a patent for dying stuff, for Guinea and Benin, granted to Sir William St. John. (The committee thought fit to have this patent called in to be seen.) [f. 153] By this means, the materials of dying enhanced to a very great price. A great complaint also against the dyers by the committee themselves. Use their trade in such a sort as intolerable. In dying black silk, gain half in half. Committee desired to have a message sent to the Lord Mayor to have him take this into his consideration as proper for his government. A bill in this House for enlargement of trade; a bill passed in 1 Jac. To give order that a copy of it may be had from the Clerk of the Upper House. / Ordered, that Sir William St. John shall bring in his patent to the committee of trade tomorrow in the afternoon. / Ordered that Sir William St. John shall bring in his patent concerning dyeing with blackwood, etc., and that a message shall be sent to the Lord Mayor to take consideration and some course for the amending of abuses in dyeing of [f. 164] silks. And that the Clerk of our House shall send to the Clerk of the Upper House for a copy of a bill put into Parliament in 1 regis concerning remedying of trade. / The trade of dyeing was a part of clothing and brings great benefit to the kingdom. There was now a [f. 73] monopoly of the trade of Guinea and Benin, from whence are brought store of dyeing stuff to Sir William St. John, who under colour of a new river takes up a great compass of the coasts where there has been ancient trading. That this patent may be brought in.
    Tomorrow appointed for Sir William St. John to bring in his patent as it was desired.
    In black silk the dyers use such ingredients as make it double the weight. It is therefore desired a letter may be sent to the Lord Mayor that care be taken that no such deceitful materials be used. In Holland the colours are in great request because of their choice of materials, whereas London dyes are everywhere refused. / SIR EDWIN SANDYS'S report from the committee of trade. The clothworkers petitioners, complained that being 12,000 maintained by their labours, now by reason of the [Merchant] Adventurers' transporting cloths undyed and undressed, though the lords of the Council had ordered they should have of them the dyeing and dressing of every tenth cloth. The dyers complained of a monopoly on dyeing stuffs procured by Sir William St. John. / Ordered, a message to be sent to the Merchants [sic] Adventurers to show cause why they should not let the clothworkers have the wetting and drawing over of every 10th cloth.
    Secondly, ordered that Sir William St. John's patent should be brought in.
    Thirdly, a message to be sent to the Lord Mayor about the abuses in dyeing silk and making it heavy. / ¶A report from the committee of trade. The clothworkers complain that one cloth in 10 is not dressed and dyed at home, according to an order made at the Council table, and desire to have it so. A complaint also against the patent of Sir William St. John about the materials of dyeing from Guinea and Benin. By reason of ill materials the dyers make 2 pound of one; and it was answered that the silkmen caused it to be so for their gain.

    Edwyn Sandys didn't like him much, it seems. lol Sir Edwyn Sandys goes on with his Report, for Ginny and Binny. - This Patent formerly censured by the Commissioners for Trade: Granted to Sir William St. John, and others, 16 Jacobi, for the sole Trading into some Parts of Africa: Clause of Imprisonment, and Confiscation of

    Goods, to visit that Coast. Four Objections against it: 1. Surreptitiously gotten, by false Information to the King. The Trade ordinary, before this Patent. 2. To the Oppression of the King's Subjects. 3. The Commodities of that Country much raised; as Red Wood. Have seized upon some Ships, and drawn Compositions from them. - Committee thought this Patent a Grievance, in Creation and Execution, and fit to be presented to his Majesty. - Desire to have a particular Patent for Three Rivers, discovered by them.

    Resolved, upon Question, That this Patent is a Grievance, in Creation and Execution; and shall be so presented to his Majesty.


    (various excerpts from British History Online regarding William's 'monopoly' and unlawful business practices per complaints of other merchants.) 
    Fact 1 19 Apr 1624  Westminster, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    ¶SIR EDWIN SANDYS reports from the committee for trade. Petitions from the clothworkers and dyers. The clothworkers complained against the Merchant Adventurers for not setting of them on work. The lords of the Council ordered that they should have the dressing of 1 in 10 of cloths transported. They complain this is not performed. To have an order here to the Merchant Adventurers to require them to perform that order, or else show cause to the House to the contrary.

    Secondly, the dyers had another petition complaining of a patent for dying stuff, for Guinea and Benin, granted to Sir William St. John. (The committee thought fit to have this patent called in to be seen.) [f. 153] By this means, the materials of dying enhanced to a very great price. A great complaint also against the dyers by the committee themselves. Use their trade in such a sort as intolerable. In dying black silk, gain half in half. Committee desired to have a message sent to the Lord Mayor to have him take this into his consideration as proper for his government. A bill in this House for enlargement of trade; a bill passed in 1 Jac. To give order that a copy of it may be had from the Clerk of the Upper House.


    SIR EDWARD VILLIERS. The fault more in the silk men than the dyers. They make them dye it so. To have that considered of too.


    MR. [WILLIAM] NOYE. To have the bonds, orders and proceedings of the Exchequer sought out.


    Resolved, upon question, that the Merchant Adventurers shall perform the order, or else show cause to the contrary.


    Ordered, that Sir William St. John shall bring in his patent to the committee of trade tomorrow in the afternoon.


    Resolved, that a message shall be sent to the Lord Mayor to take into consideration the abuse of the silk dyers for heavy-dyed silk.


    Resolved, a copy of the bill for free trade of 1 Jacobi shall be procured from the Clerk of the Lords' House.


    Resolved, that the bonds, orders and proceedings of the Exchequer concerning heavy-dyed silk shall be brought to the committee for trade to be perused.


    SIR EDWARD COKE reports the bill of usury. The amendments twice read.


    [f. 153v] Ordered, to be engrossed.


    MR. [THOMAS] WHATMAN reports Sir Richard Lumley's bill. One letter left out.


    Resolved, he shall present this amendment in writing tomorrow to be sent up to the Lords.


    Engrossed bills to be read tomorrow morning at 9 of the clock.


    [House adjourned]


    '19th April 1624', in Proceedings in Parliament 1624: The House of Commons, ed. Philip Baker (2015), British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/no-series/proceedings-1624-parl/apr-19 [accessed 11 May 2016]. 
    Fact 1 24 May 1624  Westminster, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Trade.

    Sir Edwyn Sandys reports from the Committee of Trade, Four Reports: 1. Eastland Company: 2. Ginny and Binny: 3. Turky Merchants: 4. Spanish Merchants. First, for the Eastland Company; who have the sole Importation of all necessary Commodities for Shipping. - Export yearly 8,000 Cloths dyed and dressed. Their Patent granted 31 Eliz. 17 August: A Grant, to impose on Persons of Traders, to fine, and imprison ; and a Prohibition to all others to trade thither : A Proclamation, restraining the Importation of all these Commodities, but Corn. -

    This Company have shewed themselves very tractable: Tendered to the Committee Four Propositions: 1. That Shop-keepers, and other, might not be admitted into the Company, but Merchants. This the Committee not against. 2. That no Merchants should trade thither, but only in English Bottoms; which will be a great Means to increase the Shipping of this Land. This received some Alteration. 3. That those, which came into their Company, might be subject to Government. 4. That they might pay a reasonable Fine. - Opinion of the Committee, to have a Petition to his Majesty, for accommodating these Things.

    Sir Edwyn Sandys to pen this, and to present it to the House.

    Sir Edwyn Sandys goes on with his Report, for Ginny and Binny. - This Patent formerly censured by the Commissioners for Trade: Granted to Sir William St. John, and others, 16 Jacobi, for the sole Trading into some Parts of Africa: Clause of Imprisonment, and Confiscation of

    Goods, to visit that Coast. Four Objections against it: 1. Surreptitiously gotten, by false Information to the King. The Trade ordinary, before this Patent. 2. To the Oppression of the King's Subjects. 3. The Commodities of that Country much raised; as Red Wood. Have seized upon some Ships, and drawn Compositions from them. - Committee thought this Patent a Grievance, in Creation and Execution, and fit to be presented to his Majesty. - Desire to have a particular Patent for Three Rivers, discovered by them.

    Resolved, upon Question, That this Patent is a Grievance, in Creation and Execution; and shall be so presented to his Majesty.

    Sir Edwyn Sandys goes on with his Report, for the Turkey Merchants. - A Complaint made by them, of double Impositions on Currants, and Increase of Custom on raw Silk. - Allege, that there raised on this Silk an Increase of 3d. upon a Pound of Silk, not set down in the Book of Rates. - Resolved by the Committee, that this, being but an Increase of Subsidy, and not above the Value of it, to be no Grievance, and to pass it over. -

    For the Currants ; they extremely complain of that Charge upon them: An Addition of 5s. 6 d. to the former 18d. - Committee thought fit to petition his Majesty, to take off the last Imposition of 2 s. 2 d.

    Resolved, upon Question, This shall be presented to his Majesty among the rest of the Petitions.

    Sir Edw. Sandys goes on with his Report for the Spanish Trade, in bringing in of Tobacco, instead of Money, to the Value of 100,000 l. a Year. - Committee desire to commend to the King, by Petition, for banishing Spanish Tobacco.

    Resolved, upon Question, That there shall be a Petition exhibited to his Majesty, expressing the Desire of the House to have the Importation of all Tobacco excluded, that is not of the Growth of his Majesty's Dominions.


    'House of Commons Journal Volume 1: 24 May 1624', in Journal of the House of Commons: Volume 1, 1547-1629 (London, 1802), British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/commons-jrnl/vol1/24-may-1624 [accessed 11 May 2016]. 
    Fact 1 1603-1625  Africa Find all individuals with events at this location 

    Reference: C 2/JasI/G18/13
    Description:
    Short title: Guinea Company v Best.
    Plaintiffs: Sir William Saint John (governor of company of London traders to Guinea and Binney in Africa).
    Defendants: Michael Best.
    Subject: not specified.
    Document type: answer only
    Date: 1603-1625
    Held by: The National Archives, Kew
    Legal status: Public Record(s)
    Closure status: Open Document, Open Description 
    Occupation 1618-1625  Ghana, Africa Find all individuals with events at this location 
    1st English Governor of the Gold Coast 
    Died 15 Jan 1638  St. Mary-Le-Strand, Westminster, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Fact 1 25 May 1650  Africa Find all individuals with events at this location 
    15. Answer of the Guinea Company to the remonstrance of Samuel Vassall and Company, addressed to the Council of State. Were the first that discovered and traded for gold on the coast of Guinea. No factory had previously been settled there, except one about 35 years since in Gambia River by Sir William St. John and Company, until the present traders settled one at Wiampa. In "Mr. Hakluyt's books of voyages" one Capt. Towerson is reported to have sailed along that coast, but he did not set foot on shore. The King's grant to the Company was in consideration of bringing in 10,000l. in gold, and not as is alleged, "by procurement of courtiers." Those named in the grant have all resigned their interest to Sir Nicholas Crisp and Company. In answer to the accusation that they have engrossed the whole trade on that coast, to the prejudice of the Commonwealth, enter into a long description of that trade from the time of Hump. Slany and Wil. Clobery, deceased, of the settlement of their factories, the first being in 1632, the sums expended, and the employment of a son of the King of Aguna, who was taught English. Declare that they purchased Wiampa above 17 years past, and that they will keep the Dutch from planting there, if they are put in possession of it again. [See ante, p. 331, No. 13.]


    'America and West Indies: May 1650', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 1, 1574-1660, ed. W Noel Sainsbury (London, 1860), pp. 339-340. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/america-west-indies/vol1/pp339-340 [accessed 11 May 2016]. 
    Generation 18 
    Record Status 11 May 2016 
    Record 90% Complete - Verify all material included  
    Notes 
    • High Sheriffs of Tipperary
      1605: Hon Thomas Butler
      1610: Piers Butler fitzJames of Lismalin
      1612: William St John of Skaddanston (St. Johnstown)
      1613: Thomas Cantwell
      1614: Richard Butler of Knocktopher
      1615: William O'Meary of Lisenoskey
      1616: Daniel O'Bryen
      1618: Gilbert Butler
      1619: Robert Carew
      1620: William St John
      1625: William O'Meara
    Person ID SSH0007  St. John Origin and Ancestry DNA Database | St. John Generation One - Raoul de Sancto Johanne
    Last Modified 26 May 2018 

    Father Christopher St. John, Esquire,   b. 23 Sep 1547, Uchel-olau (High-light), Gwenfo, Glamorganshire, Wales, Great Britain Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Apr 1616, Uchel-olau (High-light), Gwenfo, Glamorganshire, Wales, Great Britain Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Mother Elizabeth Bawdrep,   b. abt. 1550, of, Odyn's Fee, Pen-marc, Glamorganshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. aft. 1617  (Age ~ 68 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Married abt. 1564  Uchel-olau (High-light), Gwenfo, Glamorganshire, Wales, Great Britain Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F4329  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Eleanor de Port-St. John,   b. abt. 1586, Lydiard Tregroze, Wilshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1648, St Mary, Battersea, Surrey, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 62 years) 
    Married Feb 1611-12  St Mary, Battersea, Surrey, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Howard St. John, Esquire,   b. 3 Dec 1612, St Mary, Battersea, Surrey, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Apr 1642, St. Andrew le Wardrobe, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 29 years)  [Birth]
     2. Anne St. John,   b. 15 Feb 1613, St Mary, Battersea, Surrey, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1614, St Mary, Battersea, Surrey, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)  [Birth]
     3. Eleanor St. John,   b. 30 Jul 1616, St. Mary-Le-Strand, Westminster, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [Birth]
     4. William St. John,   b. 6 Apr 1619, SAINT MARGARET,WESTMINSTER,LONDON,ENGLAND Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Apr 1619, SAINT MARGARET,WESTMINSTER,LONDON,ENGLAND Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)  [Birth]
    +5. Barbara St. John,   b. 11 Feb 1621, SAINT MARGARET,WESTMINSTER,LONDON,ENGLAND Find all individuals with events at this location  [Birth]
     6. Lucy St. John,   b. 28 Jun 1624, SAINT MARGARET,WESTMINSTER,LONDON,ENGLAND Find all individuals with events at this location  [Birth]
    Last Modified 27 Oct 2016 
    Family ID F4339  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsMarried - Feb 1611-12 - St Mary, Battersea, Surrey, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBorn - abt. 1561 - Uchel-olau (High-light), Gwenfo, Glamorganshire, Wales, Great Britain Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Ship Captain.
    I send Captain St. John unto you for his direction and despatch; I pray favour him in it. My Lord Admiral and I this night speaking with him found him very willing to go anywhither that her Majesty should send him and upon any conditions whatsoever. But the charge he shall be at living in that place will be very great, and the entertainment of a captain of 100 foot is small, so as if he have not besides his company some good allowance he doth make an ill bargain, besides the dangers to which he shall expose himself. We did both resolve to join in a letter unto you to move my Lord your father to consider of the gentleman's poor state, unfit to bear such a out some help. My Lord Admiral is gone to bed and fast asleep, and therefore, though I write only, use my lord's name and mine to your father in it. Endorsed :??29 May 1593.? Seal. 1 p. Charles Lord Howard, Lord Admiral, to Sir Robert Cecil. - 29 May 1593 - London, England
    Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsFact 1 - Member of Privy Councel - 14 Jan 1595 - London, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Apprehended the pirate, Harris, in Scotland - 1609 - Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Captain and Commander of H.M.S. Advantage - 1609 - London, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsFact 1 - 59. Grant by Letters Patent to the Treasurer, Company, and Adventurers of Virginia. Recites Letters Patent of 23 May 1609, [ante No.49] granted at the suit of divers adventurers and planters of the first Colony in Virginia. Now, forasmuch as his Majesty understands that without the compass of said two hundred miles, and yet not far distant from said Colony, there are divers islands uninhabited, some discovered by the industry of said Company, which it may import said Colony to plant, in regard whereof they are suitors to his Majesty to grant an enlargement of said patent, as well for an extent of limits as for other matters concerning the better Government of said Company and Colony. His Majesty, tendering the good success of said plantation and Company, &c., grants to said Treasurer, &c., for ever, all the islands within three hundred leagues of the parts granted to said Treasurer, &c., in said Letters Patent, and being within 41 and 30 deg. N.L. with all lands, waters, minerals, commodities, privileges, &c., whatsoever Provided always that said islands be not possessed by any other Christian Prince or State, or within the bounds of the Northern Colony of Virginia, to enjoy said islands for ever, to be holden of his Majesty, &c. in free and common soccage, yielding the fifth part of gold and silver. And further, his Majesty grants ("that posterity may hereafter know who have adventured, and not been sparing of their purses in such a noble and generous action for the genera good of their country,") that George, Archbishop of Canterbury Gilbert Earl of Shrewsbury, Mary Countess of Shrewsbury (here follows a list of earls, countesses, bishops, lords, knights, and others, occupying 1½ membranes) who since said last Letters Patents have joined with the former adventurers of said Company, shall henceforth be free members of the Company, and shall, according to the proportion of their adventure, enjoy all rights, privileges, profits, &c., in as ample manner as any other adventurers nominated in any former Letters Patents. And his Majesty further grants that Philip Earl of Montgomery, William Lord Paget, Sir John Harrington, Sir Willm. Cavendish, Sir John Sammes (sic), Sir Samuel Sandys, Sir Thomas Freke, Sir William St. John, Sir Richard Grobham, Sir Thomas Dale, Sir Cavalliero Maycott, Richard Martin, John Bingley, Thomas Watson, and Arthure Ingram, whom said Treasurer and Company have nominated, shall be of his Majesty's Council for said first Colony. And his Majesty grants that said Treasurer, &c., shall, once every week or oftener, hold a Court for ordering said plantation, and that any five of said Council (of which the Treasurer or his deputy to be one), and fifteen at least of the generality, shall be a sufficient Court for dispatching casual matters of less weight touching said plantation, and that for the handling of affairs of great importance, as the manner of government, disposing of said possessions, and establishing of trade, there shall be held upon the last Wednesday save one of Hilary, Easter, Trinity, and Michaelmas terms for ever, a General and Solemn Assembly or Court; and the greater number so assembled shall have power to elect persons to be of "Our Council" for said Colony, nominate officers, make laws for the good of said plantation not contrary to the laws of England, and disfranchise from their Company all such as shall refuse or neglect to put in their adventure within six months after same shall be due. And whereas the non-payment of such monies promised in adventure has been found much to have hindered the progress of said plantation, and it seems reasonable that persons neglecting their promise should be compellable to make good the same, his Majesty's pleasure is that in any suits commenced by said Treasurer, &c., against such persons, the Judges both in the Courts of Chancery and Common Law further such suits, so far forth as law and equity will permit. And his Majesty farther grants to said Treasurer, Company, &c. that the greater part of them in General Court assembled, may elect into their Company as well aliens (born in any parts in amity with his Majesty) as natural subjects, who shall enjoy all privileges, profits, &c., to the Company belonging, as amply as any other adventurer; that it shall be lawful for them to transport to said Colony all such of his Majesty's subjects, or strangers that will become his Majesty's subjects, as shall willingly accompany them, with shipping, munition, victuals, merchandize, furniture, beasts, and all other things necessary for plantation, defence, and trade, without yielding any custom or duty for seven years; and that said Treasurer or his deputy or any two others of said Council shall have power to minister the oaths of supremacy and allegiance to all who shall pass to said Colony, and to minister such a formal cath as by them shall be devised to all persons employed touching said plantation, for faithful discharge of their service, also to such persons as they shall think meet for examination in any cause concerning said plantation. And whereas his Majesty has been certified that divers lewd persons having received entertainment from said Company or having contracted to be employed in said plantation, have withdrawn or refused to go thither, and that divers persons employed in said plantations have misbehaved themselves by mutinies, &c., or having been sent abroad by the Governor of Virginia for some discovery or other business, have most treacherously returned to England by stealth, or have been sent hither as misdoers, and having been questioned by Council, have by their insolent carriage shown little respect to the authority to which his Majesty has appointed them, and by most vile and slanderous reports, as well of the country of Virginia as of the government, have done as much as in them lay to bring said plantation into contempt, by means whereof not only the adventurers have been exceedingly abused, and a great number of others discouraged from joining in so noble, christian, and worthy an action, but also the ulter ruin of the same has been greatly endangered. Now, forasmuch as it appears that these abuses have grown in regard said Council have not power by said former Letters Patent to chastize such offenders, his Majesty for reformation of so enormous abuses grants to said Treasurer, &c., that it shall be lawful for any two of said Council (of which said Treasurer or Deputy to be one) to cause to be apprehended every such person as shall misbehave as before mentioned, and upon examination and proof before said Council of such misdemeanors, or upon any insolent carriage to said Council, to bind them over with good security for their good behaviour or remand them back to said Colony to be proceeded against according to the laws in use there. And for the more effectual advancing of said plantation, his Majesty, by the consent of his Privy Council, grants said Treasurer and Company license to publish lotteries, to be held for a whole year, and afterwards they shall have six months warning before his Majesty's pleasure shall be deemed altered, said lotteries to be held within this realm of England, and with such prizes, conditions, &c., as to said Treasurer, &c., shall seem convenient. And it shall be lawful for said Treasurer, &c., to elect receivers and other officers for the governing of said lotteries, and administer oaths to them for their true dealing, and to publish by proclamation said lotteries in all cities, towns, boroughs, thoroughfares, and other places within England. And his Majesty wills all mayors, justices, sheriffs, bailiffs, constables, and other his officers and subjects to be aiding and assisting said lotteries by all lawful means. And his Majesty confirms to said Treasurer, &c., all manner of privileges, &c., granted them in any his Letters Patent, and not in these presents revoked, altered or abridged. 7 membs. [Patent Roll, 9 Jas. I., Part 14.]
    'America and West Indies: Addenda 1612', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 9, 1675-1676 and Addenda 1574-1674, ed. W Noel Sainsbury (London, 1893), pp. 42-47. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/america-west-indies/vol9/pp42-47 [accessed 11 May 2016]. - 12 Mar 1612 - Westminster, England
    Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Burgess of Portsmouth - 1614 - Portsmouth, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsEducation - Admitted to Lincoln's Inn, one of the four inns of court See: http://www.innertemplelibrary.org.uk/temple-history/inner-temple-history.htm - 1616 - Lincoln's Inn, London, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - inherited Lordship of Highlight from father. - 1616 - Uchel-olau (High-light), Gwenfo, Glamorganshire, Wales, Great Britain Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Captain of the H.M.S. Destiny - Mar 1617 - London, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Built the first English fort in England's Africa Colony - 1618 - Africa Colony Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Member of the African Company - 1618 - Africa Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Vice Admiral of H.M.S. Adventurer (under Sir Henry Mervyn, Admiral) - 1623 - London, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsFact 1 - In 1624, (excerpts of 9 entries that include his name) he added dye to silk to make it weigh more. Secondly, the dyers had another petition complaining of a patent for dying stuff, for Guinea and Benin, granted to Sir William St. John. (The committee thought fit to have this patent called in to be seen.) [f. 153] By this means, the materials of dying enhanced to a very great price. A great complaint also against the dyers by the committee themselves. Use their trade in such a sort as intolerable. In dying black silk, gain half in half. Committee desired to have a message sent to the Lord Mayor to have him take this into his consideration as proper for his government. A bill in this House for enlargement of trade; a bill passed in 1 Jac. To give order that a copy of it may be had from the Clerk of the Upper House. / Ordered, that Sir William St. John shall bring in his patent to the committee of trade tomorrow in the afternoon. / Ordered that Sir William St. John shall bring in his patent concerning dyeing with blackwood, etc., and that a message shall be sent to the Lord Mayor to take consideration and some course for the amending of abuses in dyeing of [f. 164] silks. And that the Clerk of our House shall send to the Clerk of the Upper House for a copy of a bill put into Parliament in 1 regis concerning remedying of trade. / The trade of dyeing was a part of clothing and brings great benefit to the kingdom. There was now a [f. 73] monopoly of the trade of Guinea and Benin, from whence are brought store of dyeing stuff to Sir William St. John, who under colour of a new river takes up a great compass of the coasts where there has been ancient trading. That this patent may be brought in. Tomorrow appointed for Sir William St. John to bring in his patent as it was desired. In black silk the dyers use such ingredients as make it double the weight. It is therefore desired a letter may be sent to the Lord Mayor that care be taken that no such deceitful materials be used. In Holland the colours are in great request because of their choice of materials, whereas London dyes are everywhere refused. / SIR EDWIN SANDYS'S report from the committee of trade. The clothworkers petitioners, complained that being 12,000 maintained by their labours, now by reason of the [Merchant] Adventurers' transporting cloths undyed and undressed, though the lords of the Council had ordered they should have of them the dyeing and dressing of every tenth cloth. The dyers complained of a monopoly on dyeing stuffs procured by Sir William St. John. / Ordered, a message to be sent to the Merchants [sic] Adventurers to show cause why they should not let the clothworkers have the wetting and drawing over of every 10th cloth. Secondly, ordered that Sir William St. John's patent should be brought in. Thirdly, a message to be sent to the Lord Mayor about the abuses in dyeing silk and making it heavy. / ¶A report from the committee of trade. The clothworkers complain that one cloth in 10 is not dressed and dyed at home, according to an order made at the Council table, and desire to have it so. A complaint also against the patent of Sir William St. John about the materials of dyeing from Guinea and Benin. By reason of ill materials the dyers make 2 pound of one; and it was answered that the silkmen caused it to be so for their gain. Edwyn Sandys didn't like him much, it seems. lol Sir Edwyn Sandys goes on with his Report, for Ginny and Binny. - This Patent formerly censured by the Commissioners for Trade: Granted to Sir William St. John, and others, 16 Jacobi, for the sole Trading into some Parts of Africa: Clause of Imprisonment, and Confiscation of Goods, to visit that Coast. Four Objections against it: 1. Surreptitiously gotten, by false Information to the King. The Trade ordinary, before this Patent. 2. To the Oppression of the King's Subjects. 3. The Commodities of that Country much raised; as Red Wood. Have seized upon some Ships, and drawn Compositions from them. - Committee thought this Patent a Grievance, in Creation and Execution, and fit to be presented to his Majesty. - Desire to have a particular Patent for Three Rivers, discovered by them. Resolved, upon Question, That this Patent is a Grievance, in Creation and Execution; and shall be so presented to his Majesty.
    (various excerpts from British History Online regarding William's 'monopoly' and unlawful business practices per complaints of other merchants.) - 1624 - Westminster, England
    Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsFact 1 - ¶SIR EDWIN SANDYS reports from the committee for trade. Petitions from the clothworkers and dyers. The clothworkers complained against the Merchant Adventurers for not setting of them on work. The lords of the Council ordered that they should have the dressing of 1 in 10 of cloths transported. They complain this is not performed. To have an order here to the Merchant Adventurers to require them to perform that order, or else show cause to the House to the contrary. Secondly, the dyers had another petition complaining of a patent for dying stuff, for Guinea and Benin, granted to Sir William St. John. (The committee thought fit to have this patent called in to be seen.) [f. 153] By this means, the materials of dying enhanced to a very great price. A great complaint also against the dyers by the committee themselves. Use their trade in such a sort as intolerable. In dying black silk, gain half in half. Committee desired to have a message sent to the Lord Mayor to have him take this into his consideration as proper for his government. A bill in this House for enlargement of trade; a bill passed in 1 Jac. To give order that a copy of it may be had from the Clerk of the Upper House. SIR EDWARD VILLIERS. The fault more in the silk men than the dyers. They make them dye it so. To have that considered of too. MR. [WILLIAM] NOYE. To have the bonds, orders and proceedings of the Exchequer sought out. Resolved, upon question, that the Merchant Adventurers shall perform the order, or else show cause to the contrary. Ordered, that Sir William St. John shall bring in his patent to the committee of trade tomorrow in the afternoon. Resolved, that a message shall be sent to the Lord Mayor to take into consideration the abuse of the silk dyers for heavy-dyed silk. Resolved, a copy of the bill for free trade of 1 Jacobi shall be procured from the Clerk of the Lords' House. Resolved, that the bonds, orders and proceedings of the Exchequer concerning heavy-dyed silk shall be brought to the committee for trade to be perused. SIR EDWARD COKE reports the bill of usury. The amendments twice read. [f. 153v] Ordered, to be engrossed. MR. [THOMAS] WHATMAN reports Sir Richard Lumley's bill. One letter left out. Resolved, he shall present this amendment in writing tomorrow to be sent up to the Lords. Engrossed bills to be read tomorrow morning at 9 of the clock. [House adjourned]
    '19th April 1624', in Proceedings in Parliament 1624: The House of Commons, ed. Philip Baker (2015), British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/no-series/proceedings-1624-parl/apr-19 [accessed 11 May 2016]. - 19 Apr 1624 - Westminster, England
    Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsFact 1 - Trade. Sir Edwyn Sandys reports from the Committee of Trade, Four Reports: 1. Eastland Company: 2. Ginny and Binny: 3. Turky Merchants: 4. Spanish Merchants. First, for the Eastland Company; who have the sole Importation of all necessary Commodities for Shipping. - Export yearly 8,000 Cloths dyed and dressed. Their Patent granted 31 Eliz. 17 August: A Grant, to impose on Persons of Traders, to fine, and imprison ; and a Prohibition to all others to trade thither : A Proclamation, restraining the Importation of all these Commodities, but Corn. - This Company have shewed themselves very tractable: Tendered to the Committee Four Propositions: 1. That Shop-keepers, and other, might not be admitted into the Company, but Merchants. This the Committee not against. 2. That no Merchants should trade thither, but only in English Bottoms; which will be a great Means to increase the Shipping of this Land. This received some Alteration. 3. That those, which came into their Company, might be subject to Government. 4. That they might pay a reasonable Fine. - Opinion of the Committee, to have a Petition to his Majesty, for accommodating these Things. Sir Edwyn Sandys to pen this, and to present it to the House. Sir Edwyn Sandys goes on with his Report, for Ginny and Binny. - This Patent formerly censured by the Commissioners for Trade: Granted to Sir William St. John, and others, 16 Jacobi, for the sole Trading into some Parts of Africa: Clause of Imprisonment, and Confiscation of Goods, to visit that Coast. Four Objections against it: 1. Surreptitiously gotten, by false Information to the King. The Trade ordinary, before this Patent. 2. To the Oppression of the King's Subjects. 3. The Commodities of that Country much raised; as Red Wood. Have seized upon some Ships, and drawn Compositions from them. - Committee thought this Patent a Grievance, in Creation and Execution, and fit to be presented to his Majesty. - Desire to have a particular Patent for Three Rivers, discovered by them. Resolved, upon Question, That this Patent is a Grievance, in Creation and Execution; and shall be so presented to his Majesty. Sir Edwyn Sandys goes on with his Report, for the Turkey Merchants. - A Complaint made by them, of double Impositions on Currants, and Increase of Custom on raw Silk. - Allege, that there raised on this Silk an Increase of 3d. upon a Pound of Silk, not set down in the Book of Rates. - Resolved by the Committee, that this, being but an Increase of Subsidy, and not above the Value of it, to be no Grievance, and to pass it over. - For the Currants ; they extremely complain of that Charge upon them: An Addition of 5s. 6 d. to the former 18d. - Committee thought fit to petition his Majesty, to take off the last Imposition of 2 s. 2 d. Resolved, upon Question, This shall be presented to his Majesty among the rest of the Petitions. Sir Edw. Sandys goes on with his Report for the Spanish Trade, in bringing in of Tobacco, instead of Money, to the Value of 100,000 l. a Year. - Committee desire to commend to the King, by Petition, for banishing Spanish Tobacco. Resolved, upon Question, That there shall be a Petition exhibited to his Majesty, expressing the Desire of the House to have the Importation of all Tobacco excluded, that is not of the Growth of his Majesty's Dominions.
    'House of Commons Journal Volume 1: 24 May 1624', in Journal of the House of Commons: Volume 1, 1547-1629 (London, 1802), British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/commons-jrnl/vol1/24-may-1624 [accessed 11 May 2016]. - 24 May 1624 - Westminster, England
    Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsFact 1 - Reference: C 2/JasI/G18/13 Description: Short title: Guinea Company v Best. Plaintiffs: Sir William Saint John (governor of company of London traders to Guinea and Binney in Africa). Defendants: Michael Best. Subject: not specified. Document type: answer only Date: 1603-1625 Held by: The National Archives, Kew Legal status: Public Record(s) Closure status: Open Document, Open Description - 1603-1625 - Africa Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - 1st English Governor of the Gold Coast - 1618-1625 - Ghana, Africa Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsFact 1 - 15. Answer of the Guinea Company to the remonstrance of Samuel Vassall and Company, addressed to the Council of State. Were the first that discovered and traded for gold on the coast of Guinea. No factory had previously been settled there, except one about 35 years since in Gambia River by Sir William St. John and Company, until the present traders settled one at Wiampa. In "Mr. Hakluyt's books of voyages" one Capt. Towerson is reported to have sailed along that coast, but he did not set foot on shore. The King's grant to the Company was in consideration of bringing in 10,000l. in gold, and not as is alleged, "by procurement of courtiers." Those named in the grant have all resigned their interest to Sir Nicholas Crisp and Company. In answer to the accusation that they have engrossed the whole trade on that coast, to the prejudice of the Commonwealth, enter into a long description of that trade from the time of Hump. Slany and Wil. Clobery, deceased, of the settlement of their factories, the first being in 1632, the sums expended, and the employment of a son of the King of Aguna, who was taught English. Declare that they purchased Wiampa above 17 years past, and that they will keep the Dutch from planting there, if they are put in possession of it again. [See ante, p. 331, No. 13.]
    'America and West Indies: May 1650', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 1, 1574-1660, ed. W Noel Sainsbury (London, 1860), pp. 339-340. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/america-west-indies/vol1/pp339-340 [accessed 11 May 2016]. - 25 May 1650 - Africa
    Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Documents
    Cardiff MS 5.6: Welsh Pedigrees.  Courtesy of Cardiff Libraries
5.6-2 St. John: Maunsell page 496
    Cardiff MS 5.6: Welsh Pedigrees. Courtesy of Cardiff Libraries 5.6-2 St. John: Maunsell page 496
    MS 5.6 = Ph. 12126
    WELSH PEDIGREES, c. 1687
    A large and well-organised collection of Welsh and notably Glamorgan pedigrees arranged under the ‘fifteen tribes’ followed by the advenae of Glamorgan, evidently compiled by or for Francis Gwyn of Llansannor (who married the heiress of Ford Abbey, Devon, in 1690), see pp. 326, 627. Compiled before 1667–8, see pp. 327, 493. The main part of the MS is evidently a page for page copy of an exemplar in handsome italic script of which one leaf survives loose after p. 116. [Is this David Edwardes? cf. THSC (1976), p. 118]. Includes painted arms. Index on pp. 617–21.

    628 pp. Modern half-leather. ‘John Francis Gwyn 1819’ on p. 20. ‘MSS of Ford Abbey 236’ in TP’s hand on flyleaf.
    nlw 7a p.273
    nlw 7a p.273
    NLW 7A contains pedigrees of Glamorgan and Monmouth families and other parts of Wales and pages 1-275 were written in 1678.
    nlw 7a pps. 274-275
    nlw 7a pps. 274-275
    NLW 7A contains pedigrees of Glamorgan and Monmouth families and other parts of Wales and pages 1-275 were written in 1678.
    nlw 8a p.166 (UNRELIABLE RECORD)
    nlw 8a p.166 (UNRELIABLE RECORD)
    NLW 8A contains genealogies of Glamorgan families, written in 1677-78.
    Burial Record
    Burial Record
    Highlight Manor, pg. 354 Appendix III (probably from document about the medieval and moated manors of Glamorgan, Wales)
    Highlight Manor, pg. 354 Appendix III (probably from document about the medieval and moated manors of Glamorgan, Wales)
    William St. John in 1595 serving as deputy sheriff.(1) Incorporated in the existing farm buildings are traces of possibly a late medieval house of H-shaped plan that may have replaced an adjacent moated site; fragments of late medieval and 17th-century dressed stone exist loose or reset in later work.

    (1) Clark, Limbus, pp. 553-4; Cardiff Central Library, MS 3.464 (Beauchamp Survey, 1429); ibid, MS 2.1148 (transcript of Glamorgan Plea Rolls).

    Highlight (E), Wenvoe (C).
    ST 0997 6967 46 S.E.
    1618 May 30 Letter from Sir William St. John, Knight page 1 of 2
    1618 May 30 Letter from Sir William St. John, Knight page 1 of 2
    1618 May 30 Letter from Sir William St. John, Knight page 2 of 2
    1618 May 30 Letter from Sir William St. John, Knight page 2 of 2
    Barry hero who became scourge of the high seas
    Barry hero who became scourge of the high seas
    Note: references to descending from St. Johns of Fonmon are incorrect.

    St. John Probate
    Christopher St. John 1 1616-17 Will
    Christopher St. John 1 1616-17 Will
    LL/1617/5 . W [ ]

    1. In the name of god Amen : the xxijth (22nd) daie of Aprill, in Anno D[omi]ni 1616: I Christopher S[ain]t Joh[n]
    2. of Highlightt (Highlight), al[ia]s Ychelole (Uchelola) in the Com[itatus] (County) of Glam[organ] Gent[leman], and dioc[e]s[e] of Llandaff, sicke in bodie, but wh[ole]
    3. in minde, and in good and p[er]fect Remembrance (thanks be given unto th’Almightie god) Consideringe w[ith] my
    4. self the frailtie of nature, that it is requisite and necessarie for ev[er]y Christian to be in a Continuall
    5. readines for death, whensoev[er] the good will of god shalbe to Call him, doe hereby make ordeine, and
    6. declare this p[re]sent testamente, Conteyninge herein my last will in man[ner] and forme followinge: that is to
    7. saie, first I Com[m]ende my soule willinglie into the hands of th’almightie god, and my bodie unto the earth
    8. whereof it came; there to be buried in Christian Buriall. Item I doe give, devise and dispose, al[l] my
    9. whole man[nor] of Ychelole aforesaid, in possession and rev[er]c[i]on, and all Rents suits, And servic[e]s thereunto d[ ]
    10. and app[er]teyninge, togither w[i]th sixe acres of meadowe lands, and one Mill, sett, lienge, and beinge w[i]thin th[e]
    11. p[ar]ish of Wenvoe, unto my welbeloved son Sir William St John knighte, and to his heires males for e[ver]
    12. and in defaulte of such heires, unto Christopher St John, the son of Thomas St John, for terme of
    13. his naturall lif, and to his heires males for ev[er]: and in defaulte of such heires, unto William St John,
    14. the son of Oliv[er] St John, for terme of his naturall lif, and to his heires males for ev[er]: and in defaulte of such
    15. heires to the rightefull heires of mee the said Christopher St John for ev[er]. Allso my will is, that such form[er]
    16. Grannts, bargaines and Leases by mee heretofore made, upon any of my lands arrable, meadowe, and
    17. pasture, unto any of my tenannts be allowed and p[er]mitted, to be fullie, and whollie expired, and ended,
    18. w[i]thout any im[m]peachmente, vexac[i]on, or molestac[i]on of any p[er]son or p[er]sons whatsoev[er]: all w[hi]ch form[er] grannts
    19. and Demises, the w[hi]ch I have given, demised, and disposed for terme of lif or fee taile, I my self may
    20. lawfullie approve and Justifie (as it may) more evidentlie appeare by one Indenture bearinge date
    21. the iiijth (4th) daie of Februaryie, in the xxxixth (39th) yeere of the Reigne of o[u]r sov[er]reigne Ladie Elizabeth (of
    22. famous memorie) of England, Frannce, and Irelande Queene &c (4th February 1596/7): made betwine Christopher St John
    23. of Ychelole, al[ia]s highlighte, in the Com[itatus] of Glam[organ] gent[leman], of th’on[e] p[ar]tie, And Thomas St John, one of the
    24. son[n]es of Christopher St John aforesaid gent[leman], of th’other p[ar]tie, as there more at large sufficiantlie
    25. Doth and may appeere. And I doe make, ordeine, and appointe Elizabeth St John my wif, sole
    26. Executrix, of this my p[re]sent last will and testament. Allso I doe utterlie revoke, and disannull all
    27. and singular ev[er]y other form[er] testaments, wills, Legacyes, bequests, Executor or Executors, by mee in
    28. any wise before this tyme, made, named, ordeined, or appointed. In witnes whereof unto
    29. this my p[re]sent will and testamente made, I have heere putte my hande and seale, even the daie,
    30. M[o]nthe, and Yeere first above written.

    {Seal} {Seal}
    31. Christopher Saint ioh[n]


    32. p[ro]bat[um] apud Llandaff
    33. 28 May 1617 Coram
    34. M__ Mag[i]stro(?) Joh___
    35. ____

    36. Sealed, signed, and deliv[er]ed in the p[re]sence of us:
    37. William Spencer of Penmarke
    38. John Rich John Rich[a]rd of Walters farme
    39. Thomas Johnes of the same
    40. John Davyes Clerk w[i]th others

    Heraldry
    St. John Shield
    St. John Shield
    Direct decendant of St. John at St. Jean-le-Thomas, Normandy, France

  • Sources 
    1. [S42] #11886 The Golden Grove books of pedigrees (filmed 1970), (Manuscript, National Library of Wales manuscript number Castell Gorfod 7. Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1950), FHL microfilms 104,349-104,351., book 5 p. C639*. (Reliability: 2).

    2. [S43] MS. 8 - Glamorgan Pedigrees (MFU #12434), (Microfilm of mss. in the National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth. NLW MSS. 11964, 6611, 6544, 8, 6548, 3757, 6549, 3753. Salt Lake City, Utah: Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1950.), FHL microfilm 104312., p. 166 (b)*. (Reliability: 1).

    3. [S180] http://books.google.com/books?id=Y1IBAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA599&lpg=PA599&dq=%22William+St.+John%22+sheriff+of+glamorgan&source=bl&ots=a4EgXfrz5z&sig=B-7NJ-DPwba_d4tuFHTslUknvEU&hl=en&sa=X&ei=FbESU6_6MaGfyQGfrIDIDA&ved=0CFAQ6AEwBw#v=onepage&q=%22William%20St.%20John%22%20sheriff%20of%20glamorgan&f=false.

    4. [S181] KNIGHTS made in Ireland since the King coming to the Crown. Anno 1602”. Former Reference: MS 619, p. 160 1618. These documents are held at Lambeth Palace Library - 6 Pages. Supplementary information: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth, ed. J. S. Brewer & W. Bullen (6 vols., 1867-73), vol. V, document 206.


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