The St. John Genealogy

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Vice Admiral Sir William St. John, Knight

Male Abt 1561 - 1638  (~ 77 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document    Has more than 100 ancestors and 6 descendants in this family tree.

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  • Born abt. 1561  Uchel-olau (High-light), Gwenfo, Glamorganshire, Wales, Great Britain Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes (Log in)  Notes (Log in)
    Gender Male 
    Occupation 29 May 1593  London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Ship Captain.


    I send Captain St. John unto you for his direction and despatch; I pray favour him in it. My Lord Admiral and I this night speaking with him found him very willing to go anywhither that her Majesty should send him and upon any conditions whatsoever. But the charge he shall be at living in that place will be very great, and the entertainment of a captain of 100 foot is small, so as if he have not besides his company some good allowance he doth make an ill bargain, besides the dangers to which he shall expose himself. We did both resolve to join in a letter unto you to move my Lord your father to consider of the gentleman's poor state, unfit to bear such a out some help. My Lord Admiral is gone to bed and fast asleep, and therefore, though I write only, use my lord's name and mine to your father in it.
    Endorsed :??29 May 1593.?
    Seal. 1 p.
    Charles Lord Howard, Lord Admiral, to Sir Robert Cecil.

     
    Title 4 Jan 1594 
    Esquire 
    Occupation 1595  Glamorgan, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Under Sheriff 
    Fact 1 14 Jan 1595  London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Member of Privy Councel 
    Notes (Log in)  Notes (Log in)
    Census 1607  Jamestown, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Member of Jamestown Colony 
    Fact 1 16 Jul 1607  Ulster, Ireland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    290. Deputy Chichester to the Privy Council. [July 16.] S.P., Ireland, vol. 222, 101.
    ¶About six weeks since, having received intelligence from the sea-coasts of Ulster, and especially of Antrim, that Angus M'Connell and Donnell Gorme, with some other confederates, had gotten together a number of men and long boats, and were up in arms in the Islands of Scotland, intending to make attempts upon those coasts, and especially that of Cantyre (of which Angus pretends to be lord), and also upon the opposite parts of this realm, he had directed Captain St. John with the King's ship, the "Lion's Whelp," then employed on the coasts of Munster by the orders of the Admiral against pirates whom he had chased thither out of England, to roam about thither with as much expedition as he could, and then to ply up and down the channel and from the river of Strangford to that of Loghfoile, both to secure these parts and so to amuse the rebels that perhaps they would lie still. Captain St. John, within these three or four days, is arrived here with his ship, accompanied by a barque which he received in Baltymoore from Sir Ralph Bingley; both are to be employed as formerly purposed; the barque as fitter to go in and out among those islands than His Majesty's ship, which may ply elsewhere according to the captain's discretion. They have imprested to the captain 200 marks to victual them forth, and given him six barrels of powder, with match and lead; and he (Chichester) has written to the Earl of Argile to furnish him with men for the barque (if there be anything of such importance to do), and to victual her at his discretion. Prays him to allow of his good intention therein, and to let this ship or some other lie continually upon these coasts, as has been accustomed; for through the want of such a one, they are sometimes constrained to hire and man out such sorry vessels as they can get, or else to descend to such little acts and stratagems to circumvent such malefactors, as of late has been done at Youghall. There, by the setting on of Sir Richard Birle and Mr. Jebson, the vice admiral, one Hampton, of Bristow, manning a small barque that rode in that harbour with 80 men close couched under the hatches, surprised, under a cloak of friendship, Captain Coward, a Bristow man and a pirate, as they suspected; and took him with the loss of his lieutenant and two or three of his men hurt, but none at all of Hampton's side. He was shipped in a Flemish vessel of 60 tons furnished for his purpose with ordnance and victuals. Upon the first news that she was taken he (Chichester) gave order that the ordnance which was reported to be much and very good should be delivered over to Sir Oliver St. John, Master of the Ordnance here, who hath instructions and warrant dormant from the Lord Admiral to take such casualties into his hands. The barque, because she was said to be well-shaped and swift of sail, he ordered to be safely kept for His Majesty's service upon the coast (except he had other direction to the contrary), and the Vice-Admiral to accept of some reasonable consideration for her. She lies at Yoghall unrigged and of no use. Coward and his people are all there and in other places in safe prison; and he has given order to the Chief Baron, who is now in circuit that way, to see and examine how far they may be dealt with in this kingdom, and if he cannot, then to certify so much, or what else he thinks fit to be done with them. Thinks the end of it must be to transport over Coward and some other of the chiefest of them into England, and the rest to be dismissed. Sir Raphe Bingley has long hovered off and on this coast; and within these four days past learns by Captain St. John that he attacked a flyboat of his that lay unrigged at Baltimore, and himself (Bingley) came thither to him to confer about that arrest, and there delivered him a pinnace which, a little before, by virtue of the late Lord President's warrant, he had taken from one Cornelius Johnson, a Dutchman and supposed to be a pirate; also a barque for the use of the Lord Admiral, which he had taken in the Bay of Biscay from one he supposed had not come honestly by her. She is left with Captain St. Johns to be delivered to the Lord Admiral to dispose of, and Sir Raphe professes to be ready to make satisfaction for the trespass, if any be done. This is that barque which they now employ to attend the King's ship. Since these accidents has heard from Angus M'Connell, who has some purpose to come over in person; and though any one of these islanders would come to him upon the least word from him, yet this man seems to be inclined to come over without any such capitulation. If he come in that manner (as otherwise he shall not) he means to detain him until he hears Salisbury's further pleasure concerning him. Many of the inhabitants likewise of that side have made suit to come over into the county of Antrim with their goods and cattle to inhabit there, and they offer to be guides back again if they (the State) should make any expeditions against the Islanders. All this proceeds from a conceit they have, that some soldiery may be sent against them from hence, and like to come upon them and spoil them unawares. They do not here certainly know in what disgrace or terms of disloyalty these islanders stand with His Majesty, but whensoever he shall be pleased to reduce them to obedience, it is to be done from their northern parts more effectually than from any other.—Dublin Castle, 16 July 1607.

    Signed.

    Since the writing of this letter news is sent him out of Tirconnell that Caphare Oge O'Donnell, with 30 men in company, well appointed after their fashion, is gone to the Isle of of Illa [Islay], among the rebels. His return with some forces against the country there is feared, for he is a malcontent, and unsatisfied with the Earl of Tirconnell, who withholds most of his land from him, against right, as he affirms; and that was the cause of his and Neale M'Swyne's last stirs in Tirconnell. Has given directions by Captain St. John to bring him again if possibly he may come by him. And hereof has written to the Earl of Argile.

    Pp. 5. Add. Endd.: "Concerning pirates upon the coast of Ireland, and the gathering together of rebels in the north of Ireland and the Isles of Scotland."

    https:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​ireland/​1606-8/​pp208-234 
    MILI 21 Dec 1607  Dublin, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Knighted 
    Fact 1 30 Mar 1608  Ireland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    619. Sir Arthur Chichester to the Privy Council. [March 30.] S.P., Ireland, vol. 223, 55.
    Perceives by their letters of the 8th of this present, that he dwells far from good neighbours here, who, whether of ignorance or malice, offer to supplant that good opinion which he desires to maintain with them and the world.

    It was there reported that Coward, the sea captain and pirate, had not only escaped here with impunity of his demerits, but also had obtained some preferment, whereof he hopes they now understand the contrary. Explains that, immediately upon the news of Coward's arrest, he wrote to the Chief Baron, who was to hold sessions at that time in the county of Cork (where he and his men were prisoners), to proceed with their arraignment there, if by law he could. At his coming he found only the captain with four others of them in prison, whom he examined, and certified that he could find no sufficient cause against them to make an example of them to justice. Soon after he received directions from England to send Coward with the chief of them to Bristol; and so careful was he to have the directions observed, that, the very same day he received their letters, he posted them away, together with his own, to the Earl of Thomond and Sir Richard Morison, then Chief Commissioners in Munster, requiring them to send the pirates away.

    Lord Thomond, upon examination of Coward, finding it more expedient to cherish him for his better part (being a good seaman and an excellent pilot upon this coast), than otherwise to thrust him into prison, kept him with himself for a time, and soon after brought him hither to be disposed of. He (Chichester) has since kept him here, always forthcoming, expecting daily the departure of Sir William St. John with the Lion's Whelp, by whom he meant to send him. Sir William, within these three weeks, has carried Coward away with him. This is the plain truth concerning the matter, which, being seen, he hopes will justify him.

    Exculpates himself from the imputation of partiality towards the constable of the Castle of Dublin, as if, through his favour at his arraignment, he evaded due punishment for the escape of Delvin. Beseeches them to believe that he retains so deep a sense of that accident as to account it the only disaster that ever happened to him. Was bent to have the constable tried by a court-martial, where he knew he would have been assuredly condemned, but was dissuaded by others from that course in respect of the time. There is no reason why he should like well the escape of the one, or the impunity of the other; he means his not being punished capitally, for he makes no account of his fine of 500 marks, and the rather because he is not worth it. The manner of proceeding with him in his arraignment and trial they may peruse herewith, under the hands of the judges of the King's Bench and of the King's learned counsel; and for the rest refers himself to time and to them, the best discoverers of truth.

    These imputations, together with the weakness of their prisons, and the infidelity of officers and servants, proceeding for the most part out of poverty, make him timorous to lay hands upon any great man or active man, lest they should cause, after their escape, greater harm than if they had never been apprehended at all. Besides, the juries are so partial that commonly the judges cannot possibly direct them aright, but they will many times give such a verdict as pleases themselves and the priests that govern all. Notwithstanding, has within these few days caused the Earl of Thomond to apprehend Sir John M'Nemaro for matter of treason; and has sent part of his troop of horse towards Limerick to bring him up to the Castle of Dublin, wherein he is driven to keep a continual guard of soldiers to attend that charge (over and above the ward of the Castle), which he has committed to a custos, the constable being himself removed into the town jail, though his patent, which was granted him during life, long before his time, be not yet avoided. Purposes to send Sir John M'Nemaro over to their Lordships, with the testimony of his treasons written with his own hand, if it so please them.

    Lastly, concerning Thomas Crook, of Baltimore, of whom they have been informed, that he has been an abettor and reliever of Coward and other notorious pirates;—he has, on receipt of his letters, given directions to the Lord President of Munster to convey him away forthwith to him. But assures them that this is the first time that ever he heard of any such charge against him.

    Explains that some pirate, coming into Baltimore or thereabouts, landed some men, who went into the country to snatch such necessaries as they could find for their present relief. In this action they chanced to burn some little cabin or dwelling house (which is here treason), and so retired to their ship. Hereupon Crook and the other Englishmen thereabouts, went soon after aboard the pirate to demand restitution. For conferring, therefore, with these pirates (who by this accident were now become traitors) Crook and the rest were likewise accused of treason; and the matter coming in question before him by such as violently enforced the charge, he, with the assent of the Council, relieved him, and granted him His Majesty's gracious pardon.

    To return to the harbours and ports of Munster;—though all of them be very commodious and safe for pirates to come unto, yet Baltimore is most frequented by them; but they might be easily kept out thence, by the advantage of the narrow entrance in at the mouth thereof, where there is a rock naturally made to contain ordnance that would be able to sink any ship coming within reach of their shot, as of necessity it must, if it will come in. A small charge, with three or four pieces of ordnance and a few warders, will make it inaccessible to any. The "Tramontaine" has never been employed elsewhere from thence, since the first time she was sent thither to bear such guests from that shore. Only he gave a charge to the captain and master, that, forasmuch as a great number of priests, with other like seditious ministers and newsmongers, continually passed there to and fro, and that the Baron of Delvin was like to escape that way, they should now and then launch out into some convenient height in the common course between this realm and the Continent, there to intercept such passengers, if they could. Has yet heard of nothing they have done.

    Has enjoined the President of Munster to take part of this case with him, and in regard he is nearer at hand, to take the view likewise of the haven of Baltimore for the building a fort; and in the meantime to lay some convenient number of soldiers there for repelling pirates and defence of the country, especially when the King's ship shall be absent from thence.—Howth, 30 March 1608.

    ¶Pp. 7. Signed. Add. Endd.: "Sir Arthur Chichester to the Lords of the Privy Council."

    https:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​ireland/​1606-8/​pp431-448 
    Fact 1 2 Apr 1608  Dublin, Ireland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    625. Chief Baron Winch to Sir Arthur Chichester. [April 2.] S.P., Ireland, vol. 223, 60.
    In his journey towards Cork in July last, he travelled to Youghall, where Captain Coward and his company were taken, in order to be informed by Sir Richard Boyle and the mayor of Youghall, whether Coward had committed any offences for which he and his company might have received trial at the assizes at Cork, according to his Lordship's direction. At his coming to Youghall, found there only Captain Coward himself, with a young fellow that was with him in the ship; and all the rest of his company, saving four who were sent to the gaol in Cork, were set at liberty; some sent over, as he was informed, by the Vice-Admiral, and some taken by Captain St. John into the King's ship, called the "Lion's Whelp." Inquired then of the mayor of Youghall and of Sir Richard Boyle and others, if they understood of any offence committed by them within land and not on the main sea; they answered, "None, that they could hear of." Sent for Coward and the young fellow and examined them carefully; but could get no more from them than Sir Richard Boyle had before written to his Lordship. When at Cork, was much importuned by those of Coward's company there in gaol for their deliverance, because no man charged them with any offence. Answered them, it was his Lordship's direction that they should be sent into England, and that they could not be discharged. And although he was much and often importuned, yet, at his coming from them, he left them in the gaol to be sent into England; and thinking they had been continued in gaol, he sent them at the end of the circuit, by the clerk of the Crown, 40s., which, with other money, was taken from their company by a notable thief taken in Kerry.

    Thus much concerning Coward and his company. Certified his Lordship then by letter from Cork, because many of them were delivered without his privity, and no proceeding could be there against such as remained who were to be sent into England. Was there informed by Mr. Gosnall, judge, or deputy judge of the Admiralty, that he and some justices of peace had certified unto the Lord Admiral of England the whole truth of the case, from whom they expected direction what should be done with him and with those of his company then left in prison.—Dublin, 2 April 1608.

    P. 1. Signed. Add. Endd.: "Lord Justice Wynch to Lord Deputy Chichester."

    https:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​ireland/​1606-8/​pp448-494 
    Fact 1 7 Aug 1608 
    Sir William St John to the Earl of Nottingham
    Upon the 2nd of this instant my Lord of Ocheltry, his Majesty's Lieutenant, with part of his forces, about 1000 men, arrived at Ila, half a league from the castle of Donawigg, where next morning the Lord Bishop of the Isles was sent ashore to speak with Angus McKonel and his son, who kept the castle. His persuasions succeeded so well that obedience was procured from the rebels, my Lord Lieutenant accepting them in honourable and gentle terms, and came the 5th of this month aboard my ship, bringing Mac Konell and Macllyn, with other gentlemen, to finish celebrating that feast for the preservation of our Sovereign from the treasons of Gowrye, which his Lordship had at dinner begun bountifully on board his own ship. The circumstance of this, as of our hopeful suits, I presume will be related to you by messengers. The respect we receive from the Lord Lieutenant, and our endeavours to advance his Highness's service, have true correspondence; from him as a courteous commander; from us as obedient servants. I have great comfort in the helpful carefulness of Captain Win. From the galley we have no word. The victualler which carries the field pieces is much missed, and will be more if my Lord proceeds, as is intended, to go through the Isles. It is wished that she be hastened away, whereof you have been most careful as in all other your designs.?Aboard the Advantage, 7 August.
    Holograph. Endorsed: "1608." 1 p (195 33.)


    'Cecil Papers: August 1608', in Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 20, 1608, ed. M S Giuseppi and G Dyfnallt Owen (London, 1968), pp. 224-234. British History Online http:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-cecil-papers/​vol20/​pp224-234 [accessed 10 May 2016]. 
    Fact 1 30 Sep 1608  Out Isles, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    69. Sir Oliver St. John to Salisbury. [Sept. 30.] S.P., Ireland, vol. 225, 206.
    Is not able to send a certificate of military stores. Reports the return of the bearer, Sir Wm. St. John, from the Out Isles of Scotland.—Dublin, 30 September 1608.

    Pp. 2. Signed. Add. Endd.

    https:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​ireland/​1608-10/​pp22-44#h3-0014 
    Occupation 1609  Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Apprehended the pirate, Harris, in Scotland 
    Occupation 1609  London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Captain and Commander of H.M.S. Advantage 
    Occupation 1609  Jamestown, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location 
    signed the 2nd Charter of Virginia 
    Fact 1 26 Jan 1609 
    584. Sir Arthur Chichester to the Lords of the Privy Council. [Jan. 26.] S.P., Ireland, vol. 228, 12.
    After waiting eight or nine weeks, received on the 20th inst. their letters of the 12th of December, with an attachment under the seal of the Admiralty, to apprehend the bodies of the deputy vice-admiral of Munster, and other persons charged with piracy or abetting and consorting with pirates. Sent down four horsemen the morning after, with directions and warrant to the Earl of Thomond and the VicePresident of Munster, to attach them wheresoever they shall be found in those parts, and to send them hither prisoners with those horsemen and a greater guard out of that province.

    Sent their letter, which he received at the same time, to be conveyed this way to Sir William St. John.—26 January 1609.

    P. 1. Signed. Sealed. Add. Endd.: "Rec. the 1st Feb. 1609."

    https:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​ireland/​1608-10/​pp347-376
     
    Fact 1 23 May 1609  His Majesties Counsel for the Virginia Colony, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    59. Grant by Letters Patent to the Treasurer, Company, and Adventurers of Virginia. Recites Letters Patent of 23 May 1609, [ante No.49] granted at the suit of divers adventurers and planters of the first Colony in Virginia. Now, forasmuch as his Majesty understands that without the compass of said two hundred miles, and yet not far distant from said Colony, there are divers islands uninhabited, some discovered by the industry of said Company, which it may import said Colony to plant, in regard whereof they are suitors to his Majesty to grant an enlargement of said patent, as well for an extent of limits as for other matters concerning the better Government of said Company and Colony. His Majesty, tendering the good success of said plantation and Company, &c., grants to said Treasurer, &c., for ever, all the islands within three hundred leagues of the parts granted to said Treasurer, &c., in said Letters Patent, and being within 41 and 30 deg. N.L. with all lands, waters, minerals, commodities, privileges, &c., whatsoever Provided always that said islands be not possessed by any other Christian Prince or State, or within the bounds of the Northern Colony of Virginia, to enjoy said islands for ever, to be holden of his Majesty, &c. in free and common soccage, yielding the fifth part of gold and silver. And further, his Majesty grants ("that posterity may hereafter know who have adventured, and not been sparing of their purses in such a noble and generous action for the genera good of their country,") that George, Archbishop of Canterbury Gilbert Earl of Shrewsbury, Mary Countess of Shrewsbury (here follows a list of earls, countesses, bishops, lords, knights, and others, occupying 1½ membranes) who since said last Letters Patents have joined with the former adventurers of said Company, shall henceforth be free members of the Company, and shall, according to the proportion of their adventure, enjoy all rights, privileges, profits, &c., in as ample manner as any other adventurers nominated in any former Letters Patents. And his Majesty further grants that Philip Earl of Montgomery, William Lord Paget, Sir John Harrington, Sir Willm. Cavendish, Sir John Sammes (sic), Sir Samuel Sandys, Sir Thomas Freke, Sir William St. John, Sir Richard Grobham, Sir Thomas Dale, Sir Cavalliero Maycott, Richard Martin, John Bingley, Thomas Watson, and Arthure Ingram, whom said Treasurer and Company have nominated, shall be of his Majesty's Council for said first Colony. And his Majesty grants that said Treasurer, &c., shall, once every week or oftener, hold a Court for ordering said plantation, and that any five of said Council (of which the Treasurer or his deputy to be one), and fifteen at least of the generality, shall be a sufficient Court for dispatching casual matters of less weight touching said plantation, and that for the handling of affairs of great importance, as the manner of government, disposing of said possessions, and establishing of trade, there shall be held upon the last Wednesday save one of Hilary, Easter, Trinity, and Michaelmas terms for ever, a General and Solemn Assembly or Court; and the greater number so assembled shall have power to elect persons to be of "Our Council" for said Colony, nominate officers, make laws for the good of said plantation not contrary to the laws of England, and disfranchise from their Company all such as shall refuse or neglect to put in their adventure within six months after same shall be due. And whereas the non-payment of such monies promised in adventure has been found much to have hindered the progress of said plantation, and it seems reasonable that persons neglecting their promise should be compellable to make good the same, his Majesty's pleasure is that in any suits commenced by said Treasurer, &c., against such persons, the Judges both in the Courts of Chancery and Common Law further such suits, so far forth as law and equity will permit. And his Majesty farther grants to said Treasurer, Company, &c. that the greater part of them in General Court assembled, may elect into their Company as well aliens (born in any parts in amity with his Majesty) as natural subjects, who shall enjoy all privileges, profits, &c., to the Company belonging, as amply as any other adventurer; that it shall be lawful for them to transport to said Colony all such of his Majesty's subjects, or strangers that will become his Majesty's subjects, as shall willingly accompany them, with shipping, munition, victuals, merchandize, furniture, beasts, and all other things necessary for plantation, defence, and trade, without yielding any custom or duty for seven years; and that said Treasurer or his deputy or any two others of said Council shall have power to minister the oaths of supremacy and allegiance to all who shall pass to said Colony, and to minister such a formal cath as by them shall be devised to all persons employed touching said plantation, for faithful discharge of their service, also to such persons as they shall think meet for examination in any cause concerning said plantation. And whereas his Majesty has been certified that divers lewd persons having received entertainment from said Company or having contracted to be employed in said plantation, have withdrawn or refused to go thither, and that divers persons employed in said plantations have misbehaved themselves by mutinies, &c., or having been sent abroad by the Governor of Virginia for some discovery or other business, have most treacherously returned to England by stealth, or have been sent hither as misdoers, and having been questioned by Council, have by their insolent carriage shown little respect to the authority to which his Majesty has appointed them, and by most vile and slanderous reports, as well of the country of Virginia as of the government, have done as much as in them lay to bring said plantation into contempt, by means whereof not only the adventurers have been exceedingly abused, and a great number of others discouraged from joining in so noble, christian, and worthy an action, but also the ulter ruin of the same has been greatly endangered. Now, forasmuch as it appears that these abuses have grown in regard said Council have not power by said former Letters Patent to chastize such offenders, his Majesty for reformation of so enormous abuses grants to said Treasurer, &c., that it shall be lawful for any two of said Council (of which said Treasurer or Deputy to be one) to cause to be apprehended every such person as shall misbehave as before mentioned, and upon examination and proof before said Council of such misdemeanors, or upon any insolent carriage to said Council, to bind them over with good security for their good behaviour or remand them back to said Colony to be proceeded against according to the laws in use there. And for the more effectual advancing of said plantation, his Majesty, by the consent of his Privy Council, grants said Treasurer and Company license to publish lotteries, to be held for a whole year, and afterwards they shall have six months warning before his Majesty's pleasure shall be deemed altered, said lotteries to be held within this realm of England, and with such prizes, conditions, &c., as to said Treasurer, &c., shall seem convenient. And it shall be lawful for said Treasurer, &c., to elect receivers and other officers for the governing of said lotteries, and administer oaths to them for their true dealing, and to publish by proclamation said lotteries in all cities, towns, boroughs, thoroughfares, and other places within England. And his Majesty wills all mayors, justices, sheriffs, bailiffs, constables, and other his officers and subjects to be aiding and assisting said lotteries by all lawful means. And his Majesty confirms to said Treasurer, &c., all manner of privileges, &c., granted them in any his Letters Patent, and not in these presents revoked, altered or abridged. 7 membs. [Patent Roll, 9 Jas. I., Part 14.]

    https:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​colonial/​america-west-indies/​vol9/​pp42-47 
    Fact 1 10 Dec 1609  Venice, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Bishop (Bissic) was proclaimed archpirate and placed under heavy penalties. Bishop with a couple of ships met a Royal ship of five hundred tons, Captain St. John, (fn. 12) attacked and captured her, killing St. John, but he did not keep her more than a few hours. It is not known whether he was aggressor or attacked.

    12. Sir William St. John, Captain of the “ Advantage.” See Cal. S.P. Ireland, 1608–1610, p. 331. Also S.P. Dom. 1603–1610, pp. 525, 586.


    [Note: This must be a mixup of details as Sir William St. John, Knight did not die on board the ship the Advantage] 
    Census 1611  Jamestown, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Member of the Jamestown Colony 
    Occupation 1612  Jamestown, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location 
    M.C. of the Virginia Company of London and His Majesties Counsel 
    Occupation 1612  Jamestown, Virginia Colony Find all individuals with events at this location 
    signed the 3rd Charter of Virginia 
    Fact 1 5 Feb 1612  Fleet Prison, London, England, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Committed to the Fleet [prison] for some words spoken at the Council table.

    617. William Bracken to Sir John Davys. [Feb. 5.] Carte Papers, vol. 62, No. 128.
    ¶Has had certain letters read at the Council table, where the Lord Chancellor took exception to one of the reasons for suspending Poynings' Act, but after explanation did not insist on it. Two other bills were excepted against, viz., the dower, and Nugent's restitution, which he thinks they will reject. They have also rejected the reasons for suspending Poynings' Act. With regard to his private affairs, cannot advertise him further than Sir H. May has spoken with the King concerning his letter, as the other for Lord Audeley. Has heard that Mr. Darewell will succeed him, by way of reversion. Sir William St. John has been committed to the Fleet for some words spoken at the Council table. Will send shortly with Mr. Strowd's letters.—London, 5 February 1612.

    Pp. 2. Orig. Endd.

    https:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​ireland/​1611-14/​pp321-326 
    Fact 1 12 Mar 1612  Westminster, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    59. Grant by Letters Patent to the Treasurer, Company, and Adventurers of Virginia. Recites Letters Patent of 23 May 1609, [ante No.49] granted at the suit of divers adventurers and planters of the first Colony in Virginia. Now, forasmuch as his Majesty understands that without the compass of said two hundred miles, and yet not far distant from said Colony, there are divers islands uninhabited, some discovered by the industry of said Company, which it may import said Colony to plant, in regard whereof they are suitors to his Majesty to grant an enlargement of said patent, as well for an extent of limits as for other matters concerning the better Government of said Company and Colony. His Majesty, tendering the good success of said plantation and Company, &c., grants to said Treasurer, &c., for ever, all the islands within three hundred leagues of the parts granted to said Treasurer, &c., in said Letters Patent, and being within 41 and 30 deg. N.L. with all lands, waters, minerals, commodities, privileges, &c., whatsoever Provided always that said islands be not possessed by any other Christian Prince or State, or within the bounds of the Northern Colony of Virginia, to enjoy said islands for ever, to be holden of his Majesty, &c. in free and common soccage, yielding the fifth part of gold and silver. And further, his Majesty grants ("that posterity may hereafter know who have adventured, and not been sparing of their purses in such a noble and generous action for the genera good of their country,") that George, Archbishop of Canterbury Gilbert Earl of Shrewsbury, Mary Countess of Shrewsbury (here follows a list of earls, countesses, bishops, lords, knights, and others, occupying 1½ membranes) who since said last Letters Patents have joined with the former adventurers of said Company, shall henceforth be free members of the Company, and shall, according to the proportion of their adventure, enjoy all rights, privileges, profits, &c., in as ample manner as any other adventurers nominated in any former Letters Patents. And his Majesty further grants that Philip Earl of Montgomery, William Lord Paget, Sir John Harrington, Sir Willm. Cavendish, Sir John Sammes (sic), Sir Samuel Sandys, Sir Thomas Freke, Sir William St. John, Sir Richard Grobham, Sir Thomas Dale, Sir Cavalliero Maycott, Richard Martin, John Bingley, Thomas Watson, and Arthure Ingram, whom said Treasurer and Company have nominated, shall be of his Majesty's Council for said first Colony. And his Majesty grants that said Treasurer, &c., shall, once every week or oftener, hold a Court for ordering said plantation, and that any five of said Council (of which the Treasurer or his deputy to be one), and fifteen at least of the generality, shall be a sufficient Court for dispatching casual matters of less weight touching said plantation, and that for the handling of affairs of great importance, as the manner of government, disposing of said possessions, and establishing of trade, there shall be held upon the last Wednesday save one of Hilary, Easter, Trinity, and Michaelmas terms for ever, a General and Solemn Assembly or Court; and the greater number so assembled shall have power to elect persons to be of "Our Council" for said Colony, nominate officers, make laws for the good of said plantation not contrary to the laws of England, and disfranchise from their Company all such as shall refuse or neglect to put in their adventure within six months after same shall be due. And whereas the non-payment of such monies promised in adventure has been found much to have hindered the progress of said plantation, and it seems reasonable that persons neglecting their promise should be compellable to make good the same, his Majesty's pleasure is that in any suits commenced by said Treasurer, &c., against such persons, the Judges both in the Courts of Chancery and Common Law further such suits, so far forth as law and equity will permit. And his Majesty farther grants to said Treasurer, Company, &c. that the greater part of them in General Court assembled, may elect into their Company as well aliens (born in any parts in amity with his Majesty) as natural subjects, who shall enjoy all privileges, profits, &c., to the Company belonging, as amply as any other adventurer; that it shall be lawful for them to transport to said Colony all such of his Majesty's subjects, or strangers that will become his Majesty's subjects, as shall willingly accompany them, with shipping, munition, victuals, merchandize, furniture, beasts, and all other things necessary for plantation, defence, and trade, without yielding any custom or duty for seven years; and that said Treasurer or his deputy or any two others of said Council shall have power to minister the oaths of supremacy and allegiance to all who shall pass to said Colony, and to minister such a formal cath as by them shall be devised to all persons employed touching said plantation, for faithful discharge of their service, also to such persons as they shall think meet for examination in any cause concerning said plantation. And whereas his Majesty has been certified that divers lewd persons having received entertainment from said Company or having contracted to be employed in said plantation, have withdrawn or refused to go thither, and that divers persons employed in said plantations have misbehaved themselves by mutinies, &c., or having been sent abroad by the Governor of Virginia for some discovery or other business, have most treacherously returned to England by stealth, or have been sent hither as misdoers, and having been questioned by Council, have by their insolent carriage shown little respect to the authority to which his Majesty has appointed them, and by most vile and slanderous reports, as well of the country of Virginia as of the government, have done as much as in them lay to bring said plantation into contempt, by means whereof not only the adventurers have been exceedingly abused, and a great number of others discouraged from joining in so noble, christian, and worthy an action, but also the ulter ruin of the same has been greatly endangered. Now, forasmuch as it appears that these abuses have grown in regard said Council have not power by said former Letters Patent to chastize such offenders, his Majesty for reformation of so enormous abuses grants to said Treasurer, &c., that it shall be lawful for any two of said Council (of which said Treasurer or Deputy to be one) to cause to be apprehended every such person as shall misbehave as before mentioned, and upon examination and proof before said Council of such misdemeanors, or upon any insolent carriage to said Council, to bind them over with good security for their good behaviour or remand them back to said Colony to be proceeded against according to the laws in use there. And for the more effectual advancing of said plantation, his Majesty, by the consent of his Privy Council, grants said Treasurer and Company license to publish lotteries, to be held for a whole year, and afterwards they shall have six months warning before his Majesty's pleasure shall be deemed altered, said lotteries to be held within this realm of England, and with such prizes, conditions, &c., as to said Treasurer, &c., shall seem convenient. And it shall be lawful for said Treasurer, &c., to elect receivers and other officers for the governing of said lotteries, and administer oaths to them for their true dealing, and to publish by proclamation said lotteries in all cities, towns, boroughs, thoroughfares, and other places within England. And his Majesty wills all mayors, justices, sheriffs, bailiffs, constables, and other his officers and subjects to be aiding and assisting said lotteries by all lawful means. And his Majesty confirms to said Treasurer, &c., all manner of privileges, &c., granted them in any his Letters Patent, and not in these presents revoked, altered or abridged. 7 membs. [Patent Roll, 9 Jas. I., Part 14.]


    'America and West Indies: Addenda 1612', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 9, 1675-1676 and Addenda 1574-1674, ed. W Noel Sainsbury (London, 1893), pp. 42-47. British History Online http:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​colonial/​america-west-indies/​vol9/​pp42-47 [accessed 11 May 2016].
     
    Fact 1 22 Jul 1612 
    499. Lords of the Council to Sir Arthur Chichester. [July 22.] Philad. P., vol. 4, p. 225.
    Have received his two letters regarding Captain Baugh, the first, of June 26, advising his arrival at Lymecon and the measures taken for his safe abode there, awaiting instructions as to his demands, the other of July 15, reporting Sir William St. John's arrival, and the letters containing instructions from His Majesty how to proceed with the said Baugh. To both these letters they answer that the King understanding to what a height this evil had risen, and how dangerous it might prove to suffer such a desperate crew to become aware of their strength, and being importuned by the merchants here who had lost the Concord and Philip Bonaventura, was content to receive into mercy such of the captains as would return the goods and ships to their owners; of which favour some have already taken the benefit.

    Their Lordships, however, understanding from the French Ambassador here that Captain Baugh, notwithstanding his said pardon, continued to commit the same hateful crimes, and had taken divers ships of French subjects to the value of 2,000l. and upwards, in addition to various depredations of subjects of this kingdom, His Majesty had thought it his duty to suppress so notorious a grievance, and before it was known that Baugh had come to Ireland and had been taken into protection by his Excellency, had given directions to Sir William St. John to surprise him, as will appear by his warrant. They call his Lordship's attention to a clause in this warrant which is liable to misconstruction, viz., "whatsoever pardon or protection the said pirate may show unto you." This might seem to imply that Sir William St. John is to seize him even though he should find him in his Excellency's protection, whereas the meaning is, that whereas he had committtd acts of piracy since his former pardon, that pardon or protection was not to stand in the way of his being now apprehended.

    They assure him that they are very tender of the respect due to his authority, which is that of the King himself, he being His Majesty's lieutenant, and they therefore direct him to continue his protection to the said Baugh, and to hold him on such terms as may give him hope of satisfaction in his demands, promising that on His Majesty's return from his progress they will obtain the accomplishment of that which is now desired. Meanwhile he is to take special care of the goods brought in by Baugh, and to have an accurate inventory of them made, disposing of any of them which may be perishable to the best advantage of the owners.—Whitehall, 22 July 1612.

    Signed: G. Cant., T. Ellesmere, Canc., H. Northampton, E. Worcester, Jul, Cæsar, Thos. Parry.

    Pp. 2. Add. Endd.: "From the Lords of the Councell in answer of myne concerninge the seizinge of Capt. Baugh, his shippe and goods by Sir William St. John, &c." Encloses,

    https:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​ireland/​1611-14/​pp274-281
     
    Fact 1 22 Jul 1612 
    500. Lords of the Council to Sir William St. John, Captain of H. M.'s ship called the Speedwell. Philad. P., vol. 4, p. 229.
    ¶His Majesty is certainly informed that Captain Baugh and other pirates to whom he had extended pardon, is lately come into the road of Limcon in Ireland, and has since, by some fair means of the Vice-admiral, been drawn into the harbour of Kinsale. The Lords direct him (Sir William St. John) at once to prepare his ship and to repair to Kinsale or wherever else he may learn the said Baugh to be, and to seize his person, goods, and ship, (whatsoever pardon or protection the pirate shall show to him), and bring them into England. Command all captains, masters, and owners of ships, all mayors and sheriffs, constables and other officers by land or sea, and all other good subjects to aid and assist the captain. He is at the same time to assure the said Baugh and the rest, that no hurt is intended to their persons, and that it is not meant to deprive them of the benefit of His Majesty's pardon extended to others of the same condition. Any merchandise or goods found in their ships are to be placed under lock and seal. They presume that his (St. John's) ship is in condition at once to set out on the expedition in all secrecy, no one being informed of the voyage or destination. The rest is left to his own discretion.

    P. 1. Copy. Not signed or dated.

    https:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​ireland/​1611-14/​pp274-281 
    Fact 1 27 Sep 1612  Wexford, Ireland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    525. Lords of the Council to Sir Arthur Chichester. [Sept. 27.] Philad. P., vol. 4, p. 235.
    ¶To his letter of the 15th instant, with divers particulars regarding the pirates, and the proceedings towards them, their Lordships make answer,—First, if it prove true, as they think likely, that Easton has come to the island of Valentia, and that he is in such strength as is reported; the King having already, out of consideration for the safety of the persons and goods of his subjects, which were imperilled by so formidable and so wicked a course of piracy, with such power of men and means, consented to forego the strict course of justice, and to exercise his clemency, their Lordships signify their approval of his proceeding in removing the difficulties which might stand in the way of his (Easton's) submitting himself to the King's mercy; and, in order to guard against the difficulties and delays incidental to such a negociation, they refer all particulars of the conditions of submission to his own discretion, promising to confirm what he may resolve upon. Caution him however against the possibility of his (Easton's) taking advantage of any indulgence shown to him in order to revictual his ship, and resume his piratical courses.

    In the case of Baugh, they approve of his remaining under protection, and pardons for himself and his consorts shall be made out as soon as possible. As to the ship of Rotterdam lately arrived in Wexford, they approve of what he (Sir Arthur) has done in disposing of her cargo in safe keeping and selling the perishable portion thereof. Regarding his complaints against St. John, they defer their answer till they shall have had time, he being but newly arrived, to receive his answers, upon which his Lordship shall receive their resolution. —Hampton Court, 27 September 1612.

    P.S. As the affairs connected with piracy belong to the jurisdiction of the Admiral, and as the Lord Ormond is viceadmiral, they trust that his Lordship will be made acquainted with what is done in this affair.

    Signed: G. Cant., T. Ellesmere, Canc., H. Northampton, Lenox, Notingham, T. Suffolke, Gilb. Shrewsbury, E. Worcester, Pembroke, Ro. Rochester, E. Zouche, E. Wotton, Jul. Cæsar, Thos. Parry.

    Pp. 2. Sealed. Add. Endd.

    https:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​ireland/​1611-14/​pp283-290 
    Fact 1 2 Nov 1612 
    583. Sir Arthur Chichester to [ ]. [Nov. 2.] Cott. MSS., Tit. B. x. 213, B.M.
    Has received the letter of his Lordship and the Council of the 21st September, with directions about the pirates, especially Easton. Sir William St. John has so buffeted his word and protection given to Baugh, that he undertakes the affairs of the pirates reluctantly. St. John has aggravated his former wrong by embezzling Baugh's goods, while his ship was in custody; in evidence of which he refers their Lordships to an examination taken before Mr. Justice Sarsefielde.

    Hears for certain that Easton is on the coast of Munster with four or five ships, and has sent in Captain Rope to procure a protection or pardon. Has sent him a protection, and has written at large to them regarding it.

    A pirate named Harris has accused Easton and Rope of having spoken unworthily of the King and Queen in their cups. This they warmly repudiate, and he has examined one Latimar, who declares that the accusation is false, and is invented out of malice against Easton by Harris, who has run away with one of his ships, and pillaged a merchant ship of Wexford.

    Sir Thomas Loftus has voluntarily surrendered himself, being free in his conscience from the murder of Danells. He is a prisoner in the Castle. The Keatinges are drawn together to the number of three score, and stand on their keeping on the borders of the Queen's County. Is sending Sir Henry Power against them. The people of the country are friendly to them. The two sheriffs of Dublin were committed by the Archbishop of Dublin upon a writ of excommunicato faciendo. He thinks the Castle the fittest prison for them.

    Notifies the absence of the Secretary Sir Richard Cooke, the Presidents of Munster and Connaught, and the Vice president of Munster. Their absence is so serious an impediment to public service that he thinks it right to make it known, although if they knew this, they would, he is sure, take it ill at his hands.—Dublin, 2 November 1612.

    Pp. 3. Hol. Endd.

    https:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​ireland/​1611-14/​pp298-307 
    Fact 1 21 Dec 1612  Ireland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    597. Sir Arthur Chichester to [ ]. [Dec. 21.] Cott. MSS., Tit. B. x. 214, B.M.
    Has taken into protection the principal pirates with their ships and goods, namely, Baugh, Miller, and one Latimar; the latter two had but little goods and one ship each, but Baugh was strong both in men and shipping, his goods being estimated at 3,000l., but much of it was taken away and embezzled while he was a prisoner with Sir William St. John.

    Took Baugh into protection on his craving His Majesty's favour and pardon, extended to others of his profession; but though he is informed that others in England were allowed to enjoy their ill-gotten goods, he has required Baugh to give up one half of his ships to be disposed of as His Majesty may direct, to which Baugh has yielded.

    The pardon is now come. They crave to have the goods given up to them to be sold and shared, and to have the ships appraised, offering to take them at the appraisement, paying the half of the money. Urges for various reasons that this be permitted.

    Writes less at length, as Captain Skypwyth, the bearer, is fully conversant with these matters. Commends his zeal and services. He will detail the proceedings of Sir William St. Leger as to the goods and property of the pirate Baugh, while in his custody.—Dublin, 21 December 1612.

    Pp. 3. Hol. Endd.

    https:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​ireland/​1611-14/​pp307-320 
    Fact 1 5 Feb 1613  London, England, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    617. William Bracken to Sir John Davys. [Feb. 5.] Carte Papers, vol. 62, No. 128.
    Has had certain letters read at the Council table, where the Lord Chancellor took exception to one of the reasons for suspending Poynings' Act, but after explanation did not insist on it. Two other bills were excepted against, viz., the dower, and Nugent's restitution, which he thinks they will reject. They have also rejected the reasons for suspending Poynings' Act. With regard to his private affairs, cannot advertise him further than Sir H. May has spoken with the King concerning his letter, as the other for Lord Audeley. Has heard that Mr. Darewell will succeed him, by way of reversion. Sir William St. John has been committed to the Fleet for some words spoken at the Council table. Will send shortly with Mr. Strowd's letters.—London, 5 February 1612.

    Pp. 2. Orig. Endd.

    https:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​ireland/​1611-14/​pp321-326 
    Occupation 1614  Portsmouth, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Burgess of Portsmouth 
    Fact 1 27 Jan 1614 
    797. Lords of the Council to Lord Chichester. [Jan. 27.] Philad. P., vol. 4, p. 349.
    His Majesty having received the return of the commissioners sent over to inquire into the proceedings touching the lately commenced Parliament, and being now able clearly to judge of the state and composition of that body which has been so much questioned, has resolved to command the attendance of some of the nobility and others of the principal gentlemen, and commons ad audiendum judicium; and has made choice of those whose names they (the Lords) send in a list enclosed, requiring him (Chichester) to give them instant notice to repair thither to court within one month. As to his letter touching Baugh and Miller, whom he recommended to them for dispatch, Miller is satisfied, and Baugh is remitted to the law for his demand against Sir William St. John. As for the aspersions said to be cast upon him (Chichester) here, of receiving gratuities from pirates, he has been misinformed, no man being so audacious; nor do they (the Lords) understand him so ill as to entertain the least conceit of such an unworthiness in him.—Whitehall, 27 January 1613.

    Signed: G. Cant., T. Ellesmere, Canc., H. Northampton, T. Suffolke, W. Knollys, E. Wotton, L. Stanhope, Jul. Cæsar.

    P. 1. Add. Endd.

    List enclosed. [Ib., p. 352.]
    Lords:

    Viscount Gormanston.

    Lord Slane.

    Lord Delvin.

    Knights of the Shire:

    Sir Christopher Nugent, for Westmeath:

    Sir Walter Butler, for Tipperary.

    Sir Daniel O'Brien, for Clare.

    Sir John Everard, for Tipperary.

    Sir Thomas Bourke M'William, for Mayo.

    John Moore, Esq., for Galway.

    Lucas Shea, Esq., for Kilkenny.

    Citizens and Burgesses:

    Valentine Blague [Blake], for Galway.

    Edmond Tirrey, for Cork.

    Edmond Coppinger, for Youghal.

    Richard Waddey, for Waterford.

    Nicholas White, for Clonmel.

    ¶John Blacknye, for Drogheda.

    James Galway, for Limerick.

    Nicholas Langton, Kilkenny.

    Endd. by Lord Chichester: "The names of the lords, knights, and burgesses sent for repaire into England. Re. the last of Januarie 1613."

    https:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​ireland/​1611-14/​pp462-468 
    Education 1616  Lincoln's Inn, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Admitted to Lincoln's Inn, one of the four inns of court

    See: http:/​/​www​.innertemplelibrary​.org​.uk/​temple-history/​inner-temple-history​.htm 
    Occupation 1616  Uchel-olau (High-light), Gwenfo, Glamorganshire, Wales, Great Britain Find all individuals with events at this location 
    inherited Lordship of Highlight from father. 
    Occupation Mar 1617  London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Captain of the H.M.S. Destiny 
    Occupation 1618  Africa Colony Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Built the first English fort in England's Africa Colony 
    Occupation 1618  Africa Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Member of the African Company 
    Fact 1 29 Mar 1618 
    Illustration facing page 310. The letter of Sir Walter Raleigh runs as follows:—

    Sr William St. Johns. besyds the monie dew to Tite the anker Smith, ther is fifty pound that this bearer Willm : ston hath given bond for to a linnen Draper for shirtts for the companie, I pray yow to speake with Mr Herbert the Pencioner that he will satisfy yt fifty pound out of my Cussen Herberts monie, amp; in the meane while free this poore man who hath bine arrested for it.

    loving frinde.
    W. Ralegh.

    from Lee reddy
    to sett sayle this
    29th of March."


    'Errata and addenda', in Cardiff Records: Volume 2, ed. John Hobson Matthews (Cardiff, 1900), pp. i-iii. British History Online http:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cardiff-records/​vol2/​i-iii [accessed 11 May 2016]. 
    Fact 1 9 Dec 1622 
    The ambassadors of France and Spain have recently made loud complaint to the king about the ship which Soubise took, as I reported. Both are interested, the one for 100,000 crowns of grain of French merchants, the other for much ready money of shareholders for Flanders. They declare that the capture was made in these waters and the vessel taken to Plymouth under the eyes of two of the king's ships, who not only refrained from preventing it, as demanded by their duty and obedience to the commands of the Council, but the commanders of the ships, corrupted by their interests, actually shared the booty. (fn. 2) Accordingly they claim the punishment of these officers as well as reparation for the damage. The matter is certainly a very thorny one in many respects. So far the king has made no reply except that he will take due information. The Spaniards also complain of the capture of Ormuz made by means of English ships, as if the non-fulfilment of their own promises did not provide sufficient grounds for such proceedings. They know, however, quite well, that the English ships were forced to take part in that affair, and the merchants themselves complain about it because of their trade.

    The ships concerned were the Adventure and Garland and the commanders implicated Sir William St. John and Sir Henry Mervin. The matter dragged on for several months. The ship captured was the Croissant of Calais. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1619–23, pages 518, 519. Birch: Court and Times of James I, ii., page 387.

    https:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​venice/​vol17/​pp514-523 
    Occupation 1623  London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Vice Admiral of H.M.S. Adventurer (under Sir Henry Mervyn, Admiral) 
    Fact 1 19 Apr 1623  London, England, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    22. Chamberlain to Carleton. The King arrived in London on the 5th, and heard the Archbp. of Canterbury preach on Palm Sunday. Particulars of Good Friday and Easter sermons. His Majesty has removed to Hampton Court and Windsor. The Provost of Eton is dead. Sir Robt. Naunton offers to give up all pensions and promises, if he may have that place, but it is reserved by the King until Buckingham's return; and meanwhile the promise is renewed to Beecher, but with condition that he marry the widow, or provide for her and her children. Sir W. St. John and Sir Hen. Mervin, who escorted M. Soubise to Rochelle, are committed, for conniving at his surprising a Dunkirk ship, bringing treasure from Spain. The Prince has sent to request the fleet to be hastened, or he and the Infanta will be at the sea-side before it arrives, but his sending for his tilting furniture makes it thought all is not so forward as reported. Marquis Inijosa is coming as Ambassador. The dispensation has not come from Rome, but is sent for. Sir Fras. Steward has gone to fetch home Buckingham, also Sir John Wentworth and Lord Vaughan, who have lately turned Catholics, as will many more at the Infanta's coming. The Prince intends to dispense with and send home all his inferior retinue, provisions being so scarce in Spain. The King is sanguine of his son's success in Spain, and delights to talk over the story of the adventures of the journey, during which the Marquis had seven falls, Sir Fras. Cottington twelve, but the Prince not one; thinks they must have been known in the French Court, though the knowledge was dissembled. Death of Sir Thos. Lowe, and of the Earl of Bridgwater's only son. The Earl of Oxford remains in confinement till Buckingham's return; it is said he is to marry Lady Diana Cecil, with 4,000l. in money, and 1,000l. a year in land. There is a great faction in the Virginia Company; the parties are headed by the Earls of Southampton and Warwick, and others. They were heard by the King, who reproved Sir Edw. Sackville for impertinence.

    https:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​domestic/​jas1/​1619-23/​pp558-574 
    Fact 1 1624  Westminster, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    In 1624, (excerpts of 9 entries that include his name) he added dye to silk to make it weigh more. Secondly, the dyers had another petition complaining of a patent for dying stuff, for Guinea and Benin, granted to Sir William St. John. (The committee thought fit to have this patent called in to be seen.) [f. 153] By this means, the materials of dying enhanced to a very great price. A great complaint also against the dyers by the committee themselves. Use their trade in such a sort as intolerable. In dying black silk, gain half in half. Committee desired to have a message sent to the Lord Mayor to have him take this into his consideration as proper for his government. A bill in this House for enlargement of trade; a bill passed in 1 Jac. To give order that a copy of it may be had from the Clerk of the Upper House. / Ordered, that Sir William St. John shall bring in his patent to the committee of trade tomorrow in the afternoon. / Ordered that Sir William St. John shall bring in his patent concerning dyeing with blackwood, etc., and that a message shall be sent to the Lord Mayor to take consideration and some course for the amending of abuses in dyeing of [f. 164] silks. And that the Clerk of our House shall send to the Clerk of the Upper House for a copy of a bill put into Parliament in 1 regis concerning remedying of trade. / The trade of dyeing was a part of clothing and brings great benefit to the kingdom. There was now a [f. 73] monopoly of the trade of Guinea and Benin, from whence are brought store of dyeing stuff to Sir William St. John, who under colour of a new river takes up a great compass of the coasts where there has been ancient trading. That this patent may be brought in.
    Tomorrow appointed for Sir William St. John to bring in his patent as it was desired.
    In black silk the dyers use such ingredients as make it double the weight. It is therefore desired a letter may be sent to the Lord Mayor that care be taken that no such deceitful materials be used. In Holland the colours are in great request because of their choice of materials, whereas London dyes are everywhere refused. / SIR EDWIN SANDYS'S report from the committee of trade. The clothworkers petitioners, complained that being 12,000 maintained by their labours, now by reason of the [Merchant] Adventurers' transporting cloths undyed and undressed, though the lords of the Council had ordered they should have of them the dyeing and dressing of every tenth cloth. The dyers complained of a monopoly on dyeing stuffs procured by Sir William St. John. / Ordered, a message to be sent to the Merchants [sic] Adventurers to show cause why they should not let the clothworkers have the wetting and drawing over of every 10th cloth.
    Secondly, ordered that Sir William St. John's patent should be brought in.
    Thirdly, a message to be sent to the Lord Mayor about the abuses in dyeing silk and making it heavy. / ¶A report from the committee of trade. The clothworkers complain that one cloth in 10 is not dressed and dyed at home, according to an order made at the Council table, and desire to have it so. A complaint also against the patent of Sir William St. John about the materials of dyeing from Guinea and Benin. By reason of ill materials the dyers make 2 pound of one; and it was answered that the silkmen caused it to be so for their gain.

    Edwyn Sandys didn't like him much, it seems. lol Sir Edwyn Sandys goes on with his Report, for Ginny and Binny. - This Patent formerly censured by the Commissioners for Trade: Granted to Sir William St. John, and others, 16 Jacobi, for the sole Trading into some Parts of Africa: Clause of Imprisonment, and Confiscation of

    Goods, to visit that Coast. Four Objections against it: 1. Surreptitiously gotten, by false Information to the King. The Trade ordinary, before this Patent. 2. To the Oppression of the King's Subjects. 3. The Commodities of that Country much raised; as Red Wood. Have seized upon some Ships, and drawn Compositions from them. - Committee thought this Patent a Grievance, in Creation and Execution, and fit to be presented to his Majesty. - Desire to have a particular Patent for Three Rivers, discovered by them.

    Resolved, upon Question, That this Patent is a Grievance, in Creation and Execution; and shall be so presented to his Majesty.


    (various excerpts from British History Online regarding William's 'monopoly' and unlawful business practices per complaints of other merchants.) 
    Fact 1 19 Apr 1624  Westminster, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    ¶SIR EDWIN SANDYS reports from the committee for trade. Petitions from the clothworkers and dyers. The clothworkers complained against the Merchant Adventurers for not setting of them on work. The lords of the Council ordered that they should have the dressing of 1 in 10 of cloths transported. They complain this is not performed. To have an order here to the Merchant Adventurers to require them to perform that order, or else show cause to the House to the contrary.

    Secondly, the dyers had another petition complaining of a patent for dying stuff, for Guinea and Benin, granted to Sir William St. John. (The committee thought fit to have this patent called in to be seen.) [f. 153] By this means, the materials of dying enhanced to a very great price. A great complaint also against the dyers by the committee themselves. Use their trade in such a sort as intolerable. In dying black silk, gain half in half. Committee desired to have a message sent to the Lord Mayor to have him take this into his consideration as proper for his government. A bill in this House for enlargement of trade; a bill passed in 1 Jac. To give order that a copy of it may be had from the Clerk of the Upper House.


    SIR EDWARD VILLIERS. The fault more in the silk men than the dyers. They make them dye it so. To have that considered of too.


    MR. [WILLIAM] NOYE. To have the bonds, orders and proceedings of the Exchequer sought out.


    Resolved, upon question, that the Merchant Adventurers shall perform the order, or else show cause to the contrary.


    Ordered, that Sir William St. John shall bring in his patent to the committee of trade tomorrow in the afternoon.


    Resolved, that a message shall be sent to the Lord Mayor to take into consideration the abuse of the silk dyers for heavy-dyed silk.


    Resolved, a copy of the bill for free trade of 1 Jacobi shall be procured from the Clerk of the Lords' House.


    Resolved, that the bonds, orders and proceedings of the Exchequer concerning heavy-dyed silk shall be brought to the committee for trade to be perused.


    SIR EDWARD COKE reports the bill of usury. The amendments twice read.


    [f. 153v] Ordered, to be engrossed.


    MR. [THOMAS] WHATMAN reports Sir Richard Lumley's bill. One letter left out.


    Resolved, he shall present this amendment in writing tomorrow to be sent up to the Lords.


    Engrossed bills to be read tomorrow morning at 9 of the clock.


    [House adjourned]


    '19th April 1624', in Proceedings in Parliament 1624: The House of Commons, ed. Philip Baker (2015), British History Online http:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​no-series/​proceedings-1624-parl/​apr-19 [accessed 11 May 2016]. 
    Fact 1 24 May 1624  Westminster, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Trade.

    Sir Edwyn Sandys reports from the Committee of Trade, Four Reports: 1. Eastland Company: 2. Ginny and Binny: 3. Turky Merchants: 4. Spanish Merchants. First, for the Eastland Company; who have the sole Importation of all necessary Commodities for Shipping. - Export yearly 8,000 Cloths dyed and dressed. Their Patent granted 31 Eliz. 17 August: A Grant, to impose on Persons of Traders, to fine, and imprison ; and a Prohibition to all others to trade thither : A Proclamation, restraining the Importation of all these Commodities, but Corn. -

    This Company have shewed themselves very tractable: Tendered to the Committee Four Propositions: 1. That Shop-keepers, and other, might not be admitted into the Company, but Merchants. This the Committee not against. 2. That no Merchants should trade thither, but only in English Bottoms; which will be a great Means to increase the Shipping of this Land. This received some Alteration. 3. That those, which came into their Company, might be subject to Government. 4. That they might pay a reasonable Fine. - Opinion of the Committee, to have a Petition to his Majesty, for accommodating these Things.

    Sir Edwyn Sandys to pen this, and to present it to the House.

    Sir Edwyn Sandys goes on with his Report, for Ginny and Binny. - This Patent formerly censured by the Commissioners for Trade: Granted to Sir William St. John, and others, 16 Jacobi, for the sole Trading into some Parts of Africa: Clause of Imprisonment, and Confiscation of

    Goods, to visit that Coast. Four Objections against it: 1. Surreptitiously gotten, by false Information to the King. The Trade ordinary, before this Patent. 2. To the Oppression of the King's Subjects. 3. The Commodities of that Country much raised; as Red Wood. Have seized upon some Ships, and drawn Compositions from them. - Committee thought this Patent a Grievance, in Creation and Execution, and fit to be presented to his Majesty. - Desire to have a particular Patent for Three Rivers, discovered by them.

    Resolved, upon Question, That this Patent is a Grievance, in Creation and Execution; and shall be so presented to his Majesty.

    Sir Edwyn Sandys goes on with his Report, for the Turkey Merchants. - A Complaint made by them, of double Impositions on Currants, and Increase of Custom on raw Silk. - Allege, that there raised on this Silk an Increase of 3d. upon a Pound of Silk, not set down in the Book of Rates. - Resolved by the Committee, that this, being but an Increase of Subsidy, and not above the Value of it, to be no Grievance, and to pass it over. -

    For the Currants ; they extremely complain of that Charge upon them: An Addition of 5s. 6 d. to the former 18d. - Committee thought fit to petition his Majesty, to take off the last Imposition of 2 s. 2 d.

    Resolved, upon Question, This shall be presented to his Majesty among the rest of the Petitions.

    Sir Edw. Sandys goes on with his Report for the Spanish Trade, in bringing in of Tobacco, instead of Money, to the Value of 100,000 l. a Year. - Committee desire to commend to the King, by Petition, for banishing Spanish Tobacco.

    Resolved, upon Question, That there shall be a Petition exhibited to his Majesty, expressing the Desire of the House to have the Importation of all Tobacco excluded, that is not of the Growth of his Majesty's Dominions.


    'House of Commons Journal Volume 1: 24 May 1624', in Journal of the House of Commons: Volume 1, 1547-1629 (London, 1802), British History Online http:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​commons-jrnl/​vol1/​24-may-1624 [accessed 11 May 2016]. 
    Fact 1 1603-1625  Africa Find all individuals with events at this location 

    Reference: C 2/JasI/G18/13
    Description:
    Short title: Guinea Company v Best.
    Plaintiffs: Sir William Saint John (governor of company of London traders to Guinea and Binney in Africa).
    Defendants: Michael Best.
    Subject: not specified.
    Document type: answer only
    Date: 1603-1625
    Held by: The National Archives, Kew
    Legal status: Public Record(s)
    Closure status: Open Document, Open Description 
    Occupation 1618-1625  Ghana, Africa Find all individuals with events at this location 
    1st English Governor of the Gold Coast 
    Fact 1 5 Jun 1628  Whitehall, London, England, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    39. Certificate of Sir William St. John and Sir Robert Mansell, of the services of Monger Scott, as master and pilot, in various King's ships. [Underwritten is a further certificate of Peter White, to the same effect, dated 1628, June 16.]

    https:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​domestic/​chas1/​1628-9/​pp144-157 
    Fact 1 Aug 1628  London, England, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    58. The same to the Warden of the Fleet. By the Statute 1 Rich. II. cap. 12, the King may for his service take out of prison any man being in prison on a judgment, which prerogative his Majesty is not willing to lose. The Warden having in his custody Sir William St. John, whose employment is now to the King very necessary, the Warden is to deliver him to the General of the present expedition, or to some officer bringing these presents. [Unsigned.] Annexed,

    https:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​domestic/​chas1/​1628-9/​pp267-281 
    Died 15 Jan 1638  St. Mary-Le-Strand, Westminster, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Fact 1 25 May 1650  Africa Find all individuals with events at this location 
    15. Answer of the Guinea Company to the remonstrance of Samuel Vassall and Company, addressed to the Council of State. Were the first that discovered and traded for gold on the coast of Guinea. No factory had previously been settled there, except one about 35 years since in Gambia River by Sir William St. John and Company, until the present traders settled one at Wiampa. In "Mr. Hakluyt's books of voyages" one Capt. Towerson is reported to have sailed along that coast, but he did not set foot on shore. The King's grant to the Company was in consideration of bringing in 10,000l. in gold, and not as is alleged, "by procurement of courtiers." Those named in the grant have all resigned their interest to Sir Nicholas Crisp and Company. In answer to the accusation that they have engrossed the whole trade on that coast, to the prejudice of the Commonwealth, enter into a long description of that trade from the time of Hump. Slany and Wil. Clobery, deceased, of the settlement of their factories, the first being in 1632, the sums expended, and the employment of a son of the King of Aguna, who was taught English. Declare that they purchased Wiampa above 17 years past, and that they will keep the Dutch from planting there, if they are put in possession of it again. [See ante, p. 331, No. 13.]


    'America and West Indies: May 1650', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 1, 1574-1660, ed. W Noel Sainsbury (London, 1860), pp. 339-340. British History Online http:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​colonial/​america-west-indies/​vol1/​pp339-340 [accessed 11 May 2016]. 
    Fact 1 29 Jan 1909 
    594. Remembrances concerning the Public, given to Mr. Treasurer 29th January 1609. [Jan. 29.] S.P., Ireland, vol. 228, 17.
    His chief employment being for the plantation of the escheated countries, he is to apply himself especially to that subject, and to put the Lords in mind that the season of the year requires timely dispatch.

    In managing this affair he must acquaint the Lords how difficult it will be for the commissioners to distribute the lands by single, middle, or double proportions, to such as shall come from Great Britain in the name of undertakers, and what a long time that course of distribution will take up, to the hindrance of the new commissioners and the King.

    Besides which, contention will arise, and perhaps a farther mischief, who shall be placed first, and for the place itself, which will weary the commissioners and displease the undertakers. Consideration thereof has made him wish that the division may be made by baronies.

    He must remember the ministers that they be provided for next to the churches, and that it will be a hard matter to erect new parishes before the country is better peopled and settled, for he fears they shall not get the old churches rebuilt in any convenient time, where they are altogether ruined, and those repaired where part of the walls are standing.

    He is to make known the state and condition of the Erenagh lands, and when the King and Council are informed therein, they have done their duty, and it rests with the King to dispose.

    It is a matter worthy of consideration when the commissioners begin their journey into Ulster, and which county they first take in hand, that the undertakers in each county may so sort their journeys as to repair unto them in fit time, when the business of that county is in hand, otherwise their journeys will be unpleasant if they find no inns or houses to receive them, and more so if they (Chichester and the other commissioners) have not warning and means to provide for them and the army, for which he must procure money beforehand.

    They (the commissioners) must begin either with the Cavan or Armagh; if with the Cavan, must from thence go to Fermanagh, and so to Donegal, from thence to Coleraine, Tyrone, and lastly, to Armagh. If they begin at Armagh, they must end with the Cavan, which must be set down in certainty for the aforesaid reasons, but the time of their stay in each county will be as the business requires, and in that point uncertain, for three or four days must not be stood upon.

    If the King purpose to place a president or other government in Ulster, Dungannon must be his seat, it being the centre of the province, where the King must build a house and erect a town with 2,000 or 3,000 acres of land laid to it, adjoining the town on each side.

    To declare the general quiet of the kingdom, and that they are hopeful that it would continue so, if they could keep out the Jesuits and seditious priests who misguide the people. Some present course must be put in execution for banishing and restraining them.

    To declare that the works of Halebolinge, Duncannon, Castleparke, Limerick, and Gallawaye are almost finished, and that Sir Josias Bodley's accounts for the 5,000l. English, already received, are in hand, and shall be transmitted as soon as possible.

    To move the Lords for money to finish the small forts and castles in decay, and to be erected according to their letters of the 12th April 1608;—all which will be done to make them defensible against the incursion of rebels for 5,000l. English, and, when they are once perfected, they are to be kept in repair by the constables of the several places. Some money he has already disbursed, as the places required it, of which he (Ridgeway) must crave allowance.

    To move the Lords for a standing allowance over and above that which is now contained in the Establishment, towards the extraordinary payments by Concordatum; otherwise the payments made that way will keep the poor soldier without his money, the sum being of equal importance and sometimes more necessary than that contained in the establishment.

    To understand the King's pleasure concerning the customs of the port, of which he has long since written, but having received no answer, the matter stands to his disprofit.

    That the green-wax money be let to farm for some years, until the annual profit thereof is known, for albeit the people pay nearly all the green-wax money to the sheriffs and other officers, they are such ill accountants that little or no profit returns to the King, especially out of Munster and Connaught.

    That the judges may advise a course to reduce the chauntry lands within that kingdom to the Crown, by the rules of the common law; because they have not (in Ireland) the statute 1 Edw. VI., which gives all the chauntry lands in England to the Crown, of which there is good store here in the hands of private men, who have no title thereto.

    That a proclamation be made for the pardoning of all intrusions for a small fine to the King, otherwise the benefit of his intrusion to be disposed by the King at his pleasure.

    That the like course may be taken here as in England for defective titles; to wit, that some one may be allowed by the State to discover the defects, and thereupon the owner of the land to be sent for by the Deputy and Council, whereupon, if he will compound, he may pay a reasonable composition, and take a grant from the King. If he refuse to compound, the Lord Deputy, &c. to grant a lease of his lands.

    That directions may be given for a certain rate for imposing fines upon grants for strengthening defective titles, and what caution shall be taken for the lessees and such as claim under the defective titles.

    To make known the scarcity of corn in this land, and the want of small monies.

    Knows how he is pressed to grant monopolies under colour of introducing arts and mysteries, by one for making salt, another for sowing seed to make oil and woad, burning ashes for soap, making glass, saltpetre, cables and ropes, measuring corn and salt, with other such devices, for which they proffer some small rent to the King.

    Has been moved, with permission of the King and Council, for the license for drawing wine and selling tobacco, or that a custom may be put upon tobacco, and that they may farm it. In these he desires His Majesty's and his Lordship's directions.

    That the Lord Treasurer will be pleased to appoint a skilful and honest man to view all the timber woods in the kingdom, and to give notice of those which, by their nearness to the sea or portable rivers, are fit to be reserved to the King's use; for he finds the King has none of his own worth speaking of in any part of the kingdom but those in Ulster, which he conceives will be spent in the plantation, if it take the effect they wish and expect; but they only lie fit for transportation to Scotland, and therefore if some reservation be not made in time, all the timbers will be suddenly consumed, especially in Munster and other parts near the sea; for the owners have found so good vent for them in pipe boards and other cloven ware, besides planks and other timbers, that no proclamation will restrain them; the case is so general and so few good and powerful subjects to be found near the places where the woods lie to put their directions in execution.

    That the men lately sent hence to the service of the King of Sweden be employed in the service of Russia rather than that of Sweden.

    To free his (Ridgeway's) accounts from the charge of the galley.

    (Signed) Arthur Chichester.

    That he acquaint the Lords with the form of their grant of intrusion, and with his warrant for building and repairing decayed churches in the Pale.

    To understand the Lord Treasurer's pleasure touching the victualling of the forts.

    To declare the charge of sending the men to Sweden, which came but to 30s. a man, all extraordinary disbursements included.

    To acquaint the Lords with Mr. Attorney's proclamation for recalling the sons of noblemen, &c. from the seminaries beyond the seas, and for restraining their resort thither.

    By the King's letters of the 29th of March last, he (Chichester) is requested to send an estimate of the charge of some works he requires to have done, which he sent with his letters of the 13th July. To learn his further pleasure, and if the works may proceed, to procure money for that purpose.

    To declare that the mayors of cities and towns for the most part refuse to take the oath of supremacy; so do the sheriffs, bailiffs, &c. They (Chichester and the Council) desire to understand whether they shall deprive those of their offices who refuse to take the oath, or may permit them to exercise their offices if they take the oath of allegiance alone.

    They (Chichester and the Council) desire to be directed in this, for they say that they are prosecuted for their conscience when they proceed against them for their obstinacy.

    To declare that it is more useful and necessary for the King's service to have his shipping on this coast in summer than in winter, for most of the strong pirates winter in the straits, because the galleys cannot keep the seas in that season, but fly hither in the summer. In the winter there are only those who rob upon the coasts of England and France, of whom Sir William St. John has lately taken one. It were to good purpose if some of those ships appointed to keep the narrow seas, did once or twice in the winter search the harbours for pirates upon this coast, and if they lost their labour by such a journey, the same often happens to them in the narrow seas.

    To procure them direction to pass in fee-farm unto the inhabitants of Athlone, their houses, cottages, mills, backsides, gardens, orchards, and such small quantities of ground as they have now lying to their houses, for such a sum as they can draw thereunto with reservation of rents. In this he (Ridgeway) is to advise with my Lord of Clanricard, and between them to procure a warrant, if he thinks fit.

    That the commission of surrenders and defective titles be renewed, by reason the Lord Chief Baron and the Master of the Rolls are omitted in the commission.

    Patrick Crosbye tells him (Chichester) that the Lord Treasurer had some speech with him about Ely O'Carroll alias O'Carroll's country, which he (Chichester) has since his time made shire ground and laid to the King's county. It is a pretty piece of land, and Crosby says he can bring it into the King's hands by overthrowing the patent thereof made to Sir William O'Carroll. The pretending heir is an infant, whose wardship was given to Sir Thomas Ashe before his (Chichester's) time. He has stayed the proceedings in this matter until he (Ridgeway) has conferred with the Lord Treasurer therein.

    There has ever been strife and contention between the house of Ormond and the Lords of that country touching the bounds and mears, and much blood spilt on either side, and now he is told that Sir Thomas Ashe has sold over the ward to the Lord Viscount Butler, notwithstanding his advice to him not to deal therewith, and to Sir Thomas Ashe not to sell it unto him; for he doubted the sequel as he still does, but still he wishes well to the Viscount who is an honest gentleman. Would not have his power and liberty increased upon that side of the country bordering Tipperary, and part of it claimed to be within the liberty, to which by this course all will be brought in time; and therefore if Crosby can bring the country to the Crown, thinks he deserves a good recompense. For this service he demands one-half of the country in fee-farm at 50l. Eng. The rent now received upon the whole country is 100l. Ir.

    Has told him that he will be a means to the King for a competent reward for this service, but if it be at any time recovered, it is to be thought the King will be gracious to the young gentleman, and make divers freeholders of honest and substantial men who would advance his service. For now that the Moores are removed and dispersed and the Connors suppressed, if that country were well planted, there would be hope of reformation in that part where the first fire of the rebellion in Leinster has so often been kindled. He says likewise that my Lord had some speech with him about the Greames, that they might be removed to Ulster. They are now dispersed, and when they are placed together upon any land, the next country will find them ill neighbours, for they are a factious people.—Arthur Chichester.

    ¶Pp. 7. Signed. Endd.

    https:/​/​www​.british-history​.ac​.uk/​cal-state-papers/​ireland/​1608-10/​pp347-376 
    Generation 18 
    Record Status 11 May 2016 
    Record 90% Complete - Verify all material included  
    Age ~ 77 years 
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Notes 
    Person ID SSH0007  St. John Origin and Ancestry DNA Database
    Last Modified 16 Dec 2018 

    Father Ancestors Christopher St. John, Esquire
              b. 23 Sep 1547, Uchel-olau (High-light), Gwenfo, Glamorganshire, Wales, Great Britain Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 22 Apr 1616, Uchel-olau (High-light), Gwenfo, Glamorganshire, Wales, Great Britain Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Mother Ancestors Elizabeth Bawdrep
              b. abt. 1550, of, Odyn's Fee, Pen-marc, Glamorganshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. aft. 1617  (Age ~ 68 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Married abt. 1564  Uchel-olau (High-light), Gwenfo, Glamorganshire, Wales, Great Britain Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 8 children 
    Family ID F4329    |  Family Chart

    Wife Ancestors Eleanor de Port-St. John, St. John
              b. abt. 1586, Lydiard Tregroze, Wilshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 1648, St Mary, Battersea, Surrey, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 62 years) 
    Married Feb 1611-12  St Mary, Battersea, Surrey, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 6 children  [3, 4
    Last Modified 27 Oct 2016 
    Family ID F4339    |  Family Chart

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    Link to Google MapsMarried - Feb 1611-12 - St Mary, Battersea, Surrey, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBorn - abt. 1561 - Uchel-olau (High-light), Gwenfo, Glamorganshire, Wales, Great Britain Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Ship Captain.
    I send Captain St. John unto you for his direction and despatch; I pray favour him in it. My Lord Admiral and I this night speaking with him found him very willing to go anywhither that her Majesty should send him and upon any conditions whatsoever. But the charge he shall be at living in that place will be very great, and the entertainment of a captain of 100 foot is small, so as if he have not besides his company some good allowance he doth make an ill bargain, besides the dangers to which he shall expose himself. We did both resolve to join in a letter unto you to move my Lord your father to consider of the gentleman's poor state, unfit to bear such a out some help. My Lord Admiral is gone to bed and fast asleep, and therefore, though I write only, use my lord's name and mine to your father in it. Endorsed :??29 May 1593.? Seal. 1 p. Charles Lord Howard, Lord Admiral, to Sir Robert Cecil. - 29 May 1593 - London, England
    Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsFact 1 - Member of Privy Councel - 14 Jan 1595 - London, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsFact 1 - 619. Sir Arthur Chichester to the Privy Council. [March 30.] S.P., Ireland, vol. 223, 55. Perceives by their letters of the 8th of this present, that he dwells far from good neighbours here, who, whether of ignorance or malice, offer to supplant that good opinion which he desires to maintain with them and the world. It was there reported that Coward, the sea captain and pirate, had not only escaped here with impunity of his demerits, but also had obtained some preferment, whereof he hopes they now understand the contrary. Explains that, immediately upon the news of Coward's arrest, he wrote to the Chief Baron, who was to hold sessions at that time in the county of Cork (where he and his men were prisoners), to proceed with their arraignment there, if by law he could. At his coming he found only the captain with four others of them in prison, whom he examined, and certified that he could find no sufficient cause against them to make an example of them to justice. Soon after he received directions from England to send Coward with the chief of them to Bristol; and so careful was he to have the directions observed, that, the very same day he received their letters, he posted them away, together with his own, to the Earl of Thomond and Sir Richard Morison, then Chief Commissioners in Munster, requiring them to send the pirates away. Lord Thomond, upon examination of Coward, finding it more expedient to cherish him for his better part (being a good seaman and an excellent pilot upon this coast), than otherwise to thrust him into prison, kept him with himself for a time, and soon after brought him hither to be disposed of. He (Chichester) has since kept him here, always forthcoming, expecting daily the departure of Sir William St. John with the Lion's Whelp, by whom he meant to send him. Sir William, within these three weeks, has carried Coward away with him. This is the plain truth concerning the matter, which, being seen, he hopes will justify him. Exculpates himself from the imputation of partiality towards the constable of the Castle of Dublin, as if, through his favour at his arraignment, he evaded due punishment for the escape of Delvin. Beseeches them to believe that he retains so deep a sense of that accident as to account it the only disaster that ever happened to him. Was bent to have the constable tried by a court-martial, where he knew he would have been assuredly condemned, but was dissuaded by others from that course in respect of the time. There is no reason why he should like well the escape of the one, or the impunity of the other; he means his not being punished capitally, for he makes no account of his fine of 500 marks, and the rather because he is not worth it. The manner of proceeding with him in his arraignment and trial they may peruse herewith, under the hands of the judges of the King's Bench and of the King's learned counsel; and for the rest refers himself to time and to them, the best discoverers of truth. These imputations, together with the weakness of their prisons, and the infidelity of officers and servants, proceeding for the most part out of poverty, make him timorous to lay hands upon any great man or active man, lest they should cause, after their escape, greater harm than if they had never been apprehended at all. Besides, the juries are so partial that commonly the judges cannot possibly direct them aright, but they will many times give such a verdict as pleases themselves and the priests that govern all. Notwithstanding, has within these few days caused the Earl of Thomond to apprehend Sir John M'Nemaro for matter of treason; and has sent part of his troop of horse towards Limerick to bring him up to the Castle of Dublin, wherein he is driven to keep a continual guard of soldiers to attend that charge (over and above the ward of the Castle), which he has committed to a custos, the constable being himself removed into the town jail, though his patent, which was granted him during life, long before his time, be not yet avoided. Purposes to send Sir John M'Nemaro over to their Lordships, with the testimony of his treasons written with his own hand, if it so please them. Lastly, concerning Thomas Crook, of Baltimore, of whom they have been informed, that he has been an abettor and reliever of Coward and other notorious pirates;—he has, on receipt of his letters, given directions to the Lord President of Munster to convey him away forthwith to him. But assures them that this is the first time that ever he heard of any such charge against him. Explains that some pirate, coming into Baltimore or thereabouts, landed some men, who went into the country to snatch such necessaries as they could find for their present relief. In this action they chanced to burn some little cabin or dwelling house (which is here treason), and so retired to their ship. Hereupon Crook and the other Englishmen thereabouts, went soon after aboard the pirate to demand restitution. For conferring, therefore, with these pirates (who by this accident were now become traitors) Crook and the rest were likewise accused of treason; and the matter coming in question before him by such as violently enforced the charge, he, with the assent of the Council, relieved him, and granted him His Majesty's gracious pardon. To return to the harbours and ports of Munster;—though all of them be very commodious and safe for pirates to come unto, yet Baltimore is most frequented by them; but they might be easily kept out thence, by the advantage of the narrow entrance in at the mouth thereof, where there is a rock naturally made to contain ordnance that would be able to sink any ship coming within reach of their shot, as of necessity it must, if it will come in. A small charge, with three or four pieces of ordnance and a few warders, will make it inaccessible to any. The "Tramontaine" has never been employed elsewhere from thence, since the first time she was sent thither to bear such guests from that shore. Only he gave a charge to the captain and master, that, forasmuch as a great number of priests, with other like seditious ministers and newsmongers, continually passed there to and fro, and that the Baron of Delvin was like to escape that way, they should now and then launch out into some convenient height in the common course between this realm and the Continent, there to intercept such passengers, if they could. Has yet heard of nothing they have done. Has enjoined the President of Munster to take part of this case with him, and in regard he is nearer at hand, to take the view likewise of the haven of Baltimore for the building a fort; and in the meantime to lay some convenient number of soldiers there for repelling pirates and defence of the country, especially when the King's ship shall be absent from thence.—Howth, 30 March 1608. ¶Pp. 7. Signed. Add. Endd.: "Sir Arthur Chichester to the Lords of the Privy Council." https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/ireland/1606-8/pp431-448 - 30 Mar 1608 - Ireland, UK Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Apprehended the pirate, Harris, in Scotland - 1609 - Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Captain and Commander of H.M.S. Advantage - 1609 - London, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsFact 1 - 59. Grant by Letters Patent to the Treasurer, Company, and Adventurers of Virginia. Recites Letters Patent of 23 May 1609, [ante No.49] granted at the suit of divers adventurers and planters of the first Colony in Virginia. Now, forasmuch as his Majesty understands that without the compass of said two hundred miles, and yet not far distant from said Colony, there are divers islands uninhabited, some discovered by the industry of said Company, which it may import said Colony to plant, in regard whereof they are suitors to his Majesty to grant an enlargement of said patent, as well for an extent of limits as for other matters concerning the better Government of said Company and Colony. His Majesty, tendering the good success of said plantation and Company, &c., grants to said Treasurer, &c., for ever, all the islands within three hundred leagues of the parts granted to said Treasurer, &c., in said Letters Patent, and being within 41 and 30 deg. N.L. with all lands, waters, minerals, commodities, privileges, &c., whatsoever Provided always that said islands be not possessed by any other Christian Prince or State, or within the bounds of the Northern Colony of Virginia, to enjoy said islands for ever, to be holden of his Majesty, &c. in free and common soccage, yielding the fifth part of gold and silver. And further, his Majesty grants ("that posterity may hereafter know who have adventured, and not been sparing of their purses in such a noble and generous action for the genera good of their country,") that George, Archbishop of Canterbury Gilbert Earl of Shrewsbury, Mary Countess of Shrewsbury (here follows a list of earls, countesses, bishops, lords, knights, and others, occupying 1½ membranes) who since said last Letters Patents have joined with the former adventurers of said Company, shall henceforth be free members of the Company, and shall, according to the proportion of their adventure, enjoy all rights, privileges, profits, &c., in as ample manner as any other adventurers nominated in any former Letters Patents. And his Majesty further grants that Philip Earl of Montgomery, William Lord Paget, Sir John Harrington, Sir Willm. Cavendish, Sir John Sammes (sic), Sir Samuel Sandys, Sir Thomas Freke, Sir William St. John, Sir Richard Grobham, Sir Thomas Dale, Sir Cavalliero Maycott, Richard Martin, John Bingley, Thomas Watson, and Arthure Ingram, whom said Treasurer and Company have nominated, shall be of his Majesty's Council for said first Colony. And his Majesty grants that said Treasurer, &c., shall, once every week or oftener, hold a Court for ordering said plantation, and that any five of said Council (of which the Treasurer or his deputy to be one), and fifteen at least of the generality, shall be a sufficient Court for dispatching casual matters of less weight touching said plantation, and that for the handling of affairs of great importance, as the manner of government, disposing of said possessions, and establishing of trade, there shall be held upon the last Wednesday save one of Hilary, Easter, Trinity, and Michaelmas terms for ever, a General and Solemn Assembly or Court; and the greater number so assembled shall have power to elect persons to be of "Our Council" for said Colony, nominate officers, make laws for the good of said plantation not contrary to the laws of England, and disfranchise from their Company all such as shall refuse or neglect to put in their adventure within six months after same shall be due. And whereas the non-payment of such monies promised in adventure has been found much to have hindered the progress of said plantation, and it seems reasonable that persons neglecting their promise should be compellable to make good the same, his Majesty's pleasure is that in any suits commenced by said Treasurer, &c., against such persons, the Judges both in the Courts of Chancery and Common Law further such suits, so far forth as law and equity will permit. And his Majesty farther grants to said Treasurer, Company, &c. that the greater part of them in General Court assembled, may elect into their Company as well aliens (born in any parts in amity with his Majesty) as natural subjects, who shall enjoy all privileges, profits, &c., to the Company belonging, as amply as any other adventurer; that it shall be lawful for them to transport to said Colony all such of his Majesty's subjects, or strangers that will become his Majesty's subjects, as shall willingly accompany them, with shipping, munition, victuals, merchandize, furniture, beasts, and all other things necessary for plantation, defence, and trade, without yielding any custom or duty for seven years; and that said Treasurer or his deputy or any two others of said Council shall have power to minister the oaths of supremacy and allegiance to all who shall pass to said Colony, and to minister such a formal cath as by them shall be devised to all persons employed touching said plantation, for faithful discharge of their service, also to such persons as they shall think meet for examination in any cause concerning said plantation. And whereas his Majesty has been certified that divers lewd persons having received entertainment from said Company or having contracted to be employed in said plantation, have withdrawn or refused to go thither, and that divers persons employed in said plantations have misbehaved themselves by mutinies, &c., or having been sent abroad by the Governor of Virginia for some discovery or other business, have most treacherously returned to England by stealth, or have been sent hither as misdoers, and having been questioned by Council, have by their insolent carriage shown little respect to the authority to which his Majesty has appointed them, and by most vile and slanderous reports, as well of the country of Virginia as of the government, have done as much as in them lay to bring said plantation into contempt, by means whereof not only the adventurers have been exceedingly abused, and a great number of others discouraged from joining in so noble, christian, and worthy an action, but also the ulter ruin of the same has been greatly endangered. Now, forasmuch as it appears that these abuses have grown in regard said Council have not power by said former Letters Patent to chastize such offenders, his Majesty for reformation of so enormous abuses grants to said Treasurer, &c., that it shall be lawful for any two of said Council (of which said Treasurer or Deputy to be one) to cause to be apprehended every such person as shall misbehave as before mentioned, and upon examination and proof before said Council of such misdemeanors, or upon any insolent carriage to said Council, to bind them over with good security for their good behaviour or remand them back to said Colony to be proceeded against according to the laws in use there. And for the more effectual advancing of said plantation, his Majesty, by the consent of his Privy Council, grants said Treasurer and Company license to publish lotteries, to be held for a whole year, and afterwards they shall have six months warning before his Majesty's pleasure shall be deemed altered, said lotteries to be held within this realm of England, and with such prizes, conditions, &c., as to said Treasurer, &c., shall seem convenient. And it shall be lawful for said Treasurer, &c., to elect receivers and other officers for the governing of said lotteries, and administer oaths to them for their true dealing, and to publish by proclamation said lotteries in all cities, towns, boroughs, thoroughfares, and other places within England. And his Majesty wills all mayors, justices, sheriffs, bailiffs, constables, and other his officers and subjects to be aiding and assisting said lotteries by all lawful means. And his Majesty confirms to said Treasurer, &c., all manner of privileges, &c., granted them in any his Letters Patent, and not in these presents revoked, altered or abridged. 7 membs. [Patent Roll, 9 Jas. I., Part 14.]
    'America and West Indies: Addenda 1612', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 9, 1675-1676 and Addenda 1574-1674, ed. W Noel Sainsbury (London, 1893), pp. 42-47. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/america-west-indies/vol9/pp42-47 [accessed 11 May 2016]. - 12 Mar 1612 - Westminster, England
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    Link to Google MapsFact 1 - 597. Sir Arthur Chichester to [ ]. [Dec. 21.] Cott. MSS., Tit. B. x. 214, B.M. Has taken into protection the principal pirates with their ships and goods, namely, Baugh, Miller, and one Latimar; the latter two had but little goods and one ship each, but Baugh was strong both in men and shipping, his goods being estimated at 3,000l., but much of it was taken away and embezzled while he was a prisoner with Sir William St. John. Took Baugh into protection on his craving His Majesty's favour and pardon, extended to others of his profession; but though he is informed that others in England were allowed to enjoy their ill-gotten goods, he has required Baugh to give up one half of his ships to be disposed of as His Majesty may direct, to which Baugh has yielded. The pardon is now come. They crave to have the goods given up to them to be sold and shared, and to have the ships appraised, offering to take them at the appraisement, paying the half of the money. Urges for various reasons that this be permitted. Writes less at length, as Captain Skypwyth, the bearer, is fully conversant with these matters. Commends his zeal and services. He will detail the proceedings of Sir William St. Leger as to the goods and property of the pirate Baugh, while in his custody.—Dublin, 21 December 1612. Pp. 3. Hol. Endd. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/ireland/1611-14/pp307-320 - 21 Dec 1612 - Ireland, UK Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Burgess of Portsmouth - 1614 - Portsmouth, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsEducation - Admitted to Lincoln's Inn, one of the four inns of court See: http://www.innertemplelibrary.org.uk/temple-history/inner-temple-history.htm - 1616 - Lincoln's Inn, London, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - inherited Lordship of Highlight from father. - 1616 - Uchel-olau (High-light), Gwenfo, Glamorganshire, Wales, Great Britain Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Captain of the H.M.S. Destiny - Mar 1617 - London, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Built the first English fort in England's Africa Colony - 1618 - Africa Colony Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Member of the African Company - 1618 - Africa Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Vice Admiral of H.M.S. Adventurer (under Sir Henry Mervyn, Admiral) - 1623 - London, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsFact 1 - In 1624, (excerpts of 9 entries that include his name) he added dye to silk to make it weigh more. Secondly, the dyers had another petition complaining of a patent for dying stuff, for Guinea and Benin, granted to Sir William St. John. (The committee thought fit to have this patent called in to be seen.) [f. 153] By this means, the materials of dying enhanced to a very great price. A great complaint also against the dyers by the committee themselves. Use their trade in such a sort as intolerable. In dying black silk, gain half in half. Committee desired to have a message sent to the Lord Mayor to have him take this into his consideration as proper for his government. A bill in this House for enlargement of trade; a bill passed in 1 Jac. To give order that a copy of it may be had from the Clerk of the Upper House. / Ordered, that Sir William St. John shall bring in his patent to the committee of trade tomorrow in the afternoon. / Ordered that Sir William St. John shall bring in his patent concerning dyeing with blackwood, etc., and that a message shall be sent to the Lord Mayor to take consideration and some course for the amending of abuses in dyeing of [f. 164] silks. And that the Clerk of our House shall send to the Clerk of the Upper House for a copy of a bill put into Parliament in 1 regis concerning remedying of trade. / The trade of dyeing was a part of clothing and brings great benefit to the kingdom. There was now a [f. 73] monopoly of the trade of Guinea and Benin, from whence are brought store of dyeing stuff to Sir William St. John, who under colour of a new river takes up a great compass of the coasts where there has been ancient trading. That this patent may be brought in. Tomorrow appointed for Sir William St. John to bring in his patent as it was desired. In black silk the dyers use such ingredients as make it double the weight. It is therefore desired a letter may be sent to the Lord Mayor that care be taken that no such deceitful materials be used. In Holland the colours are in great request because of their choice of materials, whereas London dyes are everywhere refused. / SIR EDWIN SANDYS'S report from the committee of trade. The clothworkers petitioners, complained that being 12,000 maintained by their labours, now by reason of the [Merchant] Adventurers' transporting cloths undyed and undressed, though the lords of the Council had ordered they should have of them the dyeing and dressing of every tenth cloth. The dyers complained of a monopoly on dyeing stuffs procured by Sir William St. John. / Ordered, a message to be sent to the Merchants [sic] Adventurers to show cause why they should not let the clothworkers have the wetting and drawing over of every 10th cloth. Secondly, ordered that Sir William St. John's patent should be brought in. Thirdly, a message to be sent to the Lord Mayor about the abuses in dyeing silk and making it heavy. / ¶A report from the committee of trade. The clothworkers complain that one cloth in 10 is not dressed and dyed at home, according to an order made at the Council table, and desire to have it so. A complaint also against the patent of Sir William St. John about the materials of dyeing from Guinea and Benin. By reason of ill materials the dyers make 2 pound of one; and it was answered that the silkmen caused it to be so for their gain. Edwyn Sandys didn't like him much, it seems. lol Sir Edwyn Sandys goes on with his Report, for Ginny and Binny. - This Patent formerly censured by the Commissioners for Trade: Granted to Sir William St. John, and others, 16 Jacobi, for the sole Trading into some Parts of Africa: Clause of Imprisonment, and Confiscation of Goods, to visit that Coast. Four Objections against it: 1. Surreptitiously gotten, by false Information to the King. The Trade ordinary, before this Patent. 2. To the Oppression of the King's Subjects. 3. The Commodities of that Country much raised; as Red Wood. Have seized upon some Ships, and drawn Compositions from them. - Committee thought this Patent a Grievance, in Creation and Execution, and fit to be presented to his Majesty. - Desire to have a particular Patent for Three Rivers, discovered by them. Resolved, upon Question, That this Patent is a Grievance, in Creation and Execution; and shall be so presented to his Majesty.
    (various excerpts from British History Online regarding William's 'monopoly' and unlawful business practices per complaints of other merchants.) - 1624 - Westminster, England
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    Link to Google MapsFact 1 - ¶SIR EDWIN SANDYS reports from the committee for trade. Petitions from the clothworkers and dyers. The clothworkers complained against the Merchant Adventurers for not setting of them on work. The lords of the Council ordered that they should have the dressing of 1 in 10 of cloths transported. They complain this is not performed. To have an order here to the Merchant Adventurers to require them to perform that order, or else show cause to the House to the contrary. Secondly, the dyers had another petition complaining of a patent for dying stuff, for Guinea and Benin, granted to Sir William St. John. (The committee thought fit to have this patent called in to be seen.) [f. 153] By this means, the materials of dying enhanced to a very great price. A great complaint also against the dyers by the committee themselves. Use their trade in such a sort as intolerable. In dying black silk, gain half in half. Committee desired to have a message sent to the Lord Mayor to have him take this into his consideration as proper for his government. A bill in this House for enlargement of trade; a bill passed in 1 Jac. To give order that a copy of it may be had from the Clerk of the Upper House. SIR EDWARD VILLIERS. The fault more in the silk men than the dyers. They make them dye it so. To have that considered of too. MR. [WILLIAM] NOYE. To have the bonds, orders and proceedings of the Exchequer sought out. Resolved, upon question, that the Merchant Adventurers shall perform the order, or else show cause to the contrary. Ordered, that Sir William St. John shall bring in his patent to the committee of trade tomorrow in the afternoon. Resolved, that a message shall be sent to the Lord Mayor to take into consideration the abuse of the silk dyers for heavy-dyed silk. Resolved, a copy of the bill for free trade of 1 Jacobi shall be procured from the Clerk of the Lords' House. Resolved, that the bonds, orders and proceedings of the Exchequer concerning heavy-dyed silk shall be brought to the committee for trade to be perused. SIR EDWARD COKE reports the bill of usury. The amendments twice read. [f. 153v] Ordered, to be engrossed. MR. [THOMAS] WHATMAN reports Sir Richard Lumley's bill. One letter left out. Resolved, he shall present this amendment in writing tomorrow to be sent up to the Lords. Engrossed bills to be read tomorrow morning at 9 of the clock. [House adjourned]
    '19th April 1624', in Proceedings in Parliament 1624: The House of Commons, ed. Philip Baker (2015), British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/no-series/proceedings-1624-parl/apr-19 [accessed 11 May 2016]. - 19 Apr 1624 - Westminster, England
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    Link to Google MapsFact 1 - Trade. Sir Edwyn Sandys reports from the Committee of Trade, Four Reports: 1. Eastland Company: 2. Ginny and Binny: 3. Turky Merchants: 4. Spanish Merchants. First, for the Eastland Company; who have the sole Importation of all necessary Commodities for Shipping. - Export yearly 8,000 Cloths dyed and dressed. Their Patent granted 31 Eliz. 17 August: A Grant, to impose on Persons of Traders, to fine, and imprison ; and a Prohibition to all others to trade thither : A Proclamation, restraining the Importation of all these Commodities, but Corn. - This Company have shewed themselves very tractable: Tendered to the Committee Four Propositions: 1. That Shop-keepers, and other, might not be admitted into the Company, but Merchants. This the Committee not against. 2. That no Merchants should trade thither, but only in English Bottoms; which will be a great Means to increase the Shipping of this Land. This received some Alteration. 3. That those, which came into their Company, might be subject to Government. 4. That they might pay a reasonable Fine. - Opinion of the Committee, to have a Petition to his Majesty, for accommodating these Things. Sir Edwyn Sandys to pen this, and to present it to the House. Sir Edwyn Sandys goes on with his Report, for Ginny and Binny. - This Patent formerly censured by the Commissioners for Trade: Granted to Sir William St. John, and others, 16 Jacobi, for the sole Trading into some Parts of Africa: Clause of Imprisonment, and Confiscation of Goods, to visit that Coast. Four Objections against it: 1. Surreptitiously gotten, by false Information to the King. The Trade ordinary, before this Patent. 2. To the Oppression of the King's Subjects. 3. The Commodities of that Country much raised; as Red Wood. Have seized upon some Ships, and drawn Compositions from them. - Committee thought this Patent a Grievance, in Creation and Execution, and fit to be presented to his Majesty. - Desire to have a particular Patent for Three Rivers, discovered by them. Resolved, upon Question, That this Patent is a Grievance, in Creation and Execution; and shall be so presented to his Majesty. Sir Edwyn Sandys goes on with his Report, for the Turkey Merchants. - A Complaint made by them, of double Impositions on Currants, and Increase of Custom on raw Silk. - Allege, that there raised on this Silk an Increase of 3d. upon a Pound of Silk, not set down in the Book of Rates. - Resolved by the Committee, that this, being but an Increase of Subsidy, and not above the Value of it, to be no Grievance, and to pass it over. - For the Currants ; they extremely complain of that Charge upon them: An Addition of 5s. 6 d. to the former 18d. - Committee thought fit to petition his Majesty, to take off the last Imposition of 2 s. 2 d. Resolved, upon Question, This shall be presented to his Majesty among the rest of the Petitions. Sir Edw. Sandys goes on with his Report for the Spanish Trade, in bringing in of Tobacco, instead of Money, to the Value of 100,000 l. a Year. - Committee desire to commend to the King, by Petition, for banishing Spanish Tobacco. Resolved, upon Question, That there shall be a Petition exhibited to his Majesty, expressing the Desire of the House to have the Importation of all Tobacco excluded, that is not of the Growth of his Majesty's Dominions.
    'House of Commons Journal Volume 1: 24 May 1624', in Journal of the House of Commons: Volume 1, 1547-1629 (London, 1802), British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/commons-jrnl/vol1/24-may-1624 [accessed 11 May 2016]. - 24 May 1624 - Westminster, England
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    Link to Google MapsFact 1 - Reference: C 2/JasI/G18/13 Description: Short title: Guinea Company v Best. Plaintiffs: Sir William Saint John (governor of company of London traders to Guinea and Binney in Africa). Defendants: Michael Best. Subject: not specified. Document type: answer only Date: 1603-1625 Held by: The National Archives, Kew Legal status: Public Record(s) Closure status: Open Document, Open Description - 1603-1625 - Africa Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - 1st English Governor of the Gold Coast - 1618-1625 - Ghana, Africa Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsFact 1 - 15. Answer of the Guinea Company to the remonstrance of Samuel Vassall and Company, addressed to the Council of State. Were the first that discovered and traded for gold on the coast of Guinea. No factory had previously been settled there, except one about 35 years since in Gambia River by Sir William St. John and Company, until the present traders settled one at Wiampa. In "Mr. Hakluyt's books of voyages" one Capt. Towerson is reported to have sailed along that coast, but he did not set foot on shore. The King's grant to the Company was in consideration of bringing in 10,000l. in gold, and not as is alleged, "by procurement of courtiers." Those named in the grant have all resigned their interest to Sir Nicholas Crisp and Company. In answer to the accusation that they have engrossed the whole trade on that coast, to the prejudice of the Commonwealth, enter into a long description of that trade from the time of Hump. Slany and Wil. Clobery, deceased, of the settlement of their factories, the first being in 1632, the sums expended, and the employment of a son of the King of Aguna, who was taught English. Declare that they purchased Wiampa above 17 years past, and that they will keep the Dutch from planting there, if they are put in possession of it again. [See ante, p. 331, No. 13.]
    'America and West Indies: May 1650', in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 1, 1574-1660, ed. W Noel Sainsbury (London, 1860), pp. 339-340. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/america-west-indies/vol1/pp339-340 [accessed 11 May 2016]. - 25 May 1650 - Africa
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  • Reference  Your Name Here. "Vice Admiral Sir William St. John, Knight". The St. John Genealogy. http://stjohngenealogy.com/getperson.php?personID=SSH0007&tree=OSA0001 (accessed December 19, 2018).

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