The St. John Genealogy

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1
Name George St John
Gender Male
Birth Place VA
Birth Year 1760
Spouse Name Evaline Jolly
Marriage Year 1788
Number Pages 1

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900

Citation Information
Transcript
Birth date: 1760 Birth place: VA Marriage date: 1788 Marriage place:
Detail
Source number: 84.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: KWC.

Source Information
Title
U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900
Author
Yates Publishing 
Family F4966
 
2
Will of Dame Katherine Edgecombe, widow, Cuthele 12 December 1553

Reference: PROB 11/36/306
Description: Will of Dame Katherine Eggecombe or Edgecombe, Widow of Cuthele, Cornwall
Date: 12 December 1553
Held by: The National Archives, Kew
Legal status: Public Record
Closure status: Open Document, Open Description
In the name of our Lorde god Amen the ninth daye of December in the first year of the Reigne of our soveraigne Ladye Mary by the grace of god Quene of England Frannce and Irelande defender of the faith and of the church of England and also of Ireland in earthe the supreme head. And in the year of our Lorde god a thousand five hundred fiftee and three. I Dame Katheryne Edgecombe of England in the Countie of Cornwall widowe being sicke of body yet of hole mynde and parfytt memory Laude and praise be to Almightie god make and ordeyne this my pute testament and last will in maner and fourme following. Firste I give and bequathe my soule to almighty god my maker. Trusting by the merits of Christes passing to come to the eternall glorie and fruicion of his presens. Also I give and Bequeath to Katheryn Lutrell one of the daughters of sir John Lutrell one cheyne of gold with also were sixt Diamonds and a Rubie. To the said cheyne annexed weying (a space in the text here) ounce. And also one of my greate Bolles gilted with a cover to the saime bolle. Also I give and bequeathe to Dorothy Luttrell sister to ye said Katheryn one of my great Bolles gilt without a cover. Also I Bequeathe and give to Mary Lutrell sister to the said Dorothy and Katheryn one of my great Bolles gilt withoute cover. whiche said cheyne and plate I will he shalbe delivered to the said Katheryn Dorathye and Mary at the tyme of therr marriage or at suche tyme as they shall acomplyshe the full age of eighteen years. At the discretion of myn Executos. Also I give and Bequeathe to the foresaid Katheryn Dorathy and Mary all and almaner of suche Draper hollond and other my Napery and Lynen as shall happen to come to thande of my Executours after my deathe equally to be divided by myne Executours or the longer lyver of them Between the said Katheryn Dorathy and Mary. As yt shalbe thought wise and convenient By them or the Longest Lyver of them when the said Katheryn Dorathye and mary or any of them shalbe marryd or come to thage of eighteen years. Provided always if it happen the foresaid Katheryn Dorathy and Mary or any of them to Dye Before they be married or tain and Acompliishe the full aige of eighteen years and the said cheyne. Juells plate and Napery not delyvered as Before ye mencioned That then I will that the said Cheyne Juells plate and Napery before bequeathed and Appoynted to Be delivered to any of them that shall happen so to Dye shall be delivered unto thother two sisters that shall survive equally to be devyded Betwixt them or the longest lyver of them Being maryed or come to the Age of eighteen years at the discretion of my Executours or the Longest lyver of them. And yf it happen all and enery of the foresaid Katheryn Dorathy or Mary to Dye Before Mariage or before they Accomplished the Age of eighteen years, Then my Will ye that the foresaid Chayne plate juells and Napery and other Lynnen to them before bequeathed and not delivered shall holy remain and be to myn Executours for the performance of that my Will. And after the same parformye to be bestowed by my said Executours and the longest lyver of them. For the welth of my soule as By their discretion the longest Lyver ot them shalbe most convenient. Also I will after my decease that my Executours or the longest liver of them shall delyver or raise to be delyned fourtie shillings. That is to saye thereof to suche people as shalbe present at my Buryall and the residue thereof if any do remayine to be putt into the moneyy Box of the churche of Calstocke for the Releve of the poore people of the said parishe and also I find twenty-five pounds to Be put into the Coine Boxe of Tavistock for the Relive of the poore people there. And also I give twenty five pounds to Launceston whereof sixteen send to the poor prisoners where shalbe in the Quenes jayle at Launceston aforesaid and thother fifteen pound to Be put in the Coine Boxe of the parishe churche of Mary magdalen then, for the Releve of the poor of the said parish And also I give twenty pounds to be put in the coine Boxe of the church of Seynt Domynick for the Relive of the poore people of the said parishe, And also I give twenty pounds to be put in the coine Boxe of the parysh of Botus flemmenge for the Relive of the poore people of the said parishe. Also I will that after my demas that myn Executours shalhand all my term and intereste of one parcel of Lande called Fostirs medowe lying Beside the newe bridge of Calstock.and they to let and divise the same to willm Penryss my sirvunte for so many years as he shall happey to lyve yeldinge and paying the Rent therof dew and annstonyd and five shillings yerely to the poore mens Boxe of the parishe Churche of Calstock. And after his decease my said Executours to let and sell the said to suche parsons or persones that will give most rent for the same yelding and paying to theyres and assignes of one John Newton yerely five shillings. And also the high rent to the chief Lorde of the fee thereof during suche terme and yeres as shalbe to come after my decease. And the onerplus of the rent receyved of said parcel of lande over and above the said five shillings and high rent paid. I will that my said Executours and the longest lyver of them, shall cause hit to be put yerely into the money Boxe of the parysh of Calstock for the releve of the poore people of that said parishe during the same terms. And also I give and Bequeathe after my decease to every of my household sevuntes being adaylie waiter in my house at the tyme of my deathe (except my two chaplyns and gentelwomen) that is to saye to other of theym his or their hole yeres wages for one hole yere next after my decease. To Be accomplished from the Daye of my death as they do take of me in my Lyfe. Also I will By this my present will that myne Executours and the longest lyver of them shall hand the governance rule lettinge and settinge of all my Tynne works in the Countie of CorneWall and the hole Issue and profits thereof to take and receive into their handes till this my will By them or the longest Lyver of them Be fully performyd fulfilled. And with the same yerely to paye Mary Campere my gentilwoman foure pounds of good Lawfull money of England during herlief, yf the profytts of the said Tynne works will extende therto And the over plus of the said Issue and profytts of the said Tynne works yf eny remayne after the coste and charges allowed and deducted of myne Executours and overseers and any of them traveling aboute the same and for the firste workinge and gathering of the same tynne shalbe Bestowed and employed By my said Executours and the longest lyver of them to the performance of thro my will, And after that my will performed the same shalbe delivered by my Executours or by the longest lyver of them or by and of them. To the foresaid Katheryn Luttrell and her assignes. To whosome after the decease of the foresaid Mary Campere and this my will performed. I will that all my foresaid Tynneworks shall go and remayne to her and her assignee According to the Custome of the County of Cornwall. Also I bequeathe to my daughter Mary Lutrell after my decease all suche stuff of household and other goodes as she hath of myne at Dunstes in the Countie of Someset which sometime was sir griffeth Ryse her Fathers. Also I give and Bequeathe after my decease to Thomas Corbett my sirvunte yf he be on Lyve one Cowe. And provyd yearly. To hym to Be paide during his lief of my goode profytts of my Tinneworks Bythanndes of myne Executours yf they or eny of them so longe happey to hand eny goodes or tynneworks of myne in their hands. Also I give and Bequeathe to my survante Alice Crewe twenty shillings And also I will that either of my Executours and overseers and gentilwomen and Chapleyne and other of them shall have one blacke gowne. And I will also that eache of my fine Chaplyns shall have a hole yeres wages to be accounpted from the Daye of my deathe. Also I will that my olde Chaplyn Sir Willyam Jenkyne shall have and marke more cover and above his wages in consideration of his old shrine. And also I will that every one of my sirvunts being present at my buryall shall have a blacke cote, And also I will that my said Executours and Overseers and the longest lyver of them shall hand all their costs charge and expense done and susteyned as well aboute the funeral at the tyme of my Buriall, as also all other testes charges and expenses that they or the longest lyver of them or any of them shall susteyn or be at for the performance or by reason of this my last will and testament. And over that I will that myn Executours hereafter in this my Will named and the Longest lyver of them shall have all my goodes cattalls debts juwells Plate and ymplements of household and therewith to paye as well all my Lanfull and trewe Debts that I shall owe at the tyme of my decease as also to parfourme all other my legacies giftes and Bequests specified and comprised in that my last will and testament as farre as my goods cattalls and Debts will extende and streche unto. And also I will that if it happen my Executours or any of them to be said vexed troubled or molested for any matter or cause concernynge and the said Ladye Katheryn or this my will or for any matter or cause concerning my late Husbands Sir Griffith Ris or Sir Pierce Eggecombe rights or any of them or of and for any other thinge or thinges wherby they or any of them shall or may be charged or burdened as myne Executours. Then my will ye that my said Executors and the Longest lyver of them shall retayn and kepe in their owne hands suche parte and porcion of any goodes and cattalles as well for their owne costs charges and espence as also for suche costs charges and expenses as myn Executours or any of them shall expend leyoute Disburse beat or by any meane susteyne for defence of the said in that any of them shall expend always and I will that all the residue of suche my goodes Cattalls Plate Juells Ymplements of household as clerely remayne and Be in thandes of my Executours after my funeral charges debts Legacies bequests and all other Charge before specified fully paide discharged and parformyd over due to this piece well. That they my mynde and will ye that myne Executours and the longest Lyver of them shall hand the same to distribute and despose the same by their discrecione. I shall happey otherwise to you and Bestowe the same in my lyftyme. And to the intent that my last will and testament shall be truly performyd kept and executyd according to my true meaning. I do make and constitute my trusted and Loving brother Sir John Sent Jone Knight and my trusty Nephew Sir Thomas Stradlyng Knight my Executours of this my last will and testament. And also I do make and appoynte my wellbeloved Mr John Mormay doctor of Divinitie and Adam Willyams gentleman to be my Overseers of this my last will and testament to see that hit Be fulfilled performed executyd and kept according to my trewe meanyng. And for their Traveiles and payments to the true performance of the same and that myn Executours shall prosecute and see all accounts as shall be requisite and nedefull to Be sued for the Recoverie of my death. My will is that they and Every of them shall and as hereafter folowith that is to wite. To my said Brother Sir John Seint Jone one Bere cuppe wf acover duble gilte weying sixteen ouncs And my said Nephewe Sir Thomas Stradlyng one full w flacon double gilte weying seventeen ounces and the said Mr. John Moremay six pounds twelve shillings four pence. And the said Adam Williams six pounds thirteen shillings four pence. And my debts Being By my said Executours or the longest lyver of them once Recorded shalbe to these of my said Executours and the longest lyver of them to the performance of this my will. And after this my will performyd. They to have the same in suche sorte as the residue of my goodes ar to them By this my will Before lymitted and Appoynted. In witness whereof I have caused that my present Last will to be written. That persones following Being presente and witnesses to the said. Moreover my will ye that Adam Rawley my husband Mr Eggecombes old servant shall have yerely during his natural lyfe twent six shillings eight pence to be paide By my said Executours and the Longest Lyver of them. Witnesse By me John Marshall, By me John whitweed, By me Willin Percey. By me John Bener, By me Thom and Renlay.
Probate
Will proved: 11th December 1553.
Administration granted to: Johanne Saint John Thomas Stradlynge
Transcribed by Angela Wood
 
St. John, Katherine (I11771)
 
3 in 1516 the statement "Katheryne shall come to the age of XV (15) yeres att which tyme it is appoynted that the seid Thomas Stradling and Katherine shall lye together and from thensforth to..."

by 1518 the contract had not been met as agreed. 
Gamage, Catherine (I11831)
 
4 St. John, John Pierce (1833-1916) ? also known as John P. St. John ? of Olathe, Johnson County, Kan. Born in Brookville, Franklin County, Ind., February 25, 1833. Lawyer; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; member of Kansas state senate, 1873; Governor of Kansas, 1879-83; Prohibition candidate for President of the United States, 1884. Died in Olathe, Johnson County, Kan., August 31, 1916 (age 83 years, 188 days). Interment at Olathe Cemetery, Olathe, Kan.
Relatives: Son of Sophia (Snell) St. John (1797-1851) and Samuel St. John (1802-1855); married, March 28, 1852, to Mary Jane Brewer (divorced 1859); married, March 28, 1860, to Susan Jane Parker (1838-1925).
See also National Governors Association biography
Image source: The Parties and The Men (1896) 
St. John, Kansas State Senator (1872); 8th Governor (1878 - 1882) John Pierce (OSA5060O)
 
5 "Elizabeth, da. of Sir John de la Bere, widow of John, son of Oliver St. John, asserts a certain boy named John to be son and heir of John de St. John, son and heir of Oliver. [East Luccombe] Family F3435
 
6 "Elizabeth, da. of Sir John de la Bere, widow of John, son of Oliver St. John, asserts a certain boy named John to be son and heir of John de St. John, son and heir of Oliver. [East Luccombe] St. John, John (I) (I104783185)
 
7 "Gwaithfoed" the Pseudonym by Stephen P. Matthews
https://www.facebook.com/Gwaithfoed/?fref=ts

and book

http://www.lulu.com/shop/steve-matthews/gwaithfoed-the-pseudonym/ebook/product-20654724.html 
Gwaithfoed (I105066151)
 
8 "John St. John. Living 46 Edw. III. (1372-3). Died subsequently to the death of his father [Oliver St. John, Aug. 1373], "in partibus transmarinis." St. John, John (I) (I104783185)
 
9 "Oliver St. John, "Chivaler." Died in Aug. 47 Edw. III. (1373). Seised of the manor of East Luccombe jure uxoris. Inq. p.m. 7 Ric. II., No. 115." St. John, Oliver of East Luccombe (SSH0008)
 
10 #4-14 The descendants of William Reynolds Reynolds, William (I8401)
 
11 #5-25 The descendants of William Reynolds Reynolds, Ann (I8369)
 
12 #6-49 The descendants of William Reynolds Stanton, Mary (I8358)
 
13 #7-130 The descendants of William Reynolds Farlow, William Stanton (I8343)
 
14 'C 143/248/17: Alexander de Sancto Johanne and Elizabeth his wife and
Oliver de Sancto Johanne and Elizabeth his wife to settle the manors of
East Luccombe (Somers.) and Stockleigh Luccombe [in Cheriton Fitzpaine]
co. Devon, with the advowsons of the churches of Luccombe and
Selworthy, on the said Alexander and Elizabeth his wife for their
lives, with remainder to the said Oliver and Elizabeth his wife and the
heirs of their bodies, remainder to John son of the said Alexander and
the heirs of his body, remainder to Theobald brother of John and the
heirs of his body, remainder to Henry brother of Theobald and the heirs
of his body, remainder to the right heirs of the said John, retaining
land in Instow. 13 EDWARD III.'

That 1998 posting also identified the wife of Oliver St John as
Elizabeth de Luccombe, daughter of a Hugh de Luccombe. Some chancery
suits conform that the manor of East Luccombe did remain in the hands
of the St Johns:

C 44/10/13 Parties: Rex v Seynt Johan Subject: Manor of East Luccombe
(annexed are a writ and return super causa capcionis and an extract
from the Red Book of the Exchequer) County: Som 4 Ric II

C 44/12/1 Parties: Rex v St John Subject: Manor of East Luccombe
County: Som 7 Ric II

C 44/13/5 Parties: St John v Earl of Nottingham Subject: Manor of East
Luccombe & advowsons of East Luccombe & Syllyworthy County: Som 8 Ric
II


An extra bit of data about this Luccombe family can now be found
through Google Book Search. From the 'Nomina Villarum' of Somerset, 16
Edward III - P. 36:

'Hund: de Caringtone (Carhampton)

Loccome. Item Hugo de Loccome tenet iiij. feodum de Henrico de Pinkeny,
et idem Henricus de Rege, set non fit mentio per quod servicium, &c.'

The St John/Luccombe connection is also mentioned in passing in 'The
Registers of Walter Giffard, Bishop of Bath and Wells, 1265-1266, and
of Henry Bowett, Bishop of Bath and Wells, 1401-1407', at the end under
'Notes on Bowet's Register' (P. 93):

'108. For the St. John's of Luccombe, cf. Collinson, ii.,23. Elizabeth
de Luccombe married Oliver de St. John, the father of Henry, and
brought this manor with her.' 
St. John, Lord of Instow & East Luccombe Alexander Knight, of Instow, Devon, England, UK (SSH0009)
 
15 'C 143/248/17: Alexander de Sancto Johanne and Elizabeth his wife andOliver de Sancto Johanne and Elizabeth his wife to settle the manors of
East Luccombe (Somers.) and Stockleigh Luccombe [in Cheriton Fitzpaine]
co. Devon, with the advowsons of the churches of Luccombe and
Selworthy, on the said Alexander and Elizabeth his wife for their
lives, with remainder to the said Oliver and Elizabeth his wife and the
heirs of their bodies, remainder to John son of the said Alexander and
the heirs of his body, remainder to Theobald brother of John and the
heirs of his body, remainder to Henry brother of Theobald and the heirs
of his body, remainder to the right heirs of the said John, retainingland in Instow. 13 EDWARD III.'

That 1998 posting also identified the wife of Oliver St John asElizabeth de Luccombe, daughter of a Hugh de Luccombe. Some chancery
suits conform that the manor of East Luccombe did remain in the handsof the St Johns:

C 44/10/13 Parties: Rex v Seynt Johan Subject: Manor of East Luccombe(annexed are a writ and return super causa capcionis and an extractfrom the Red Book of the Exchequer) County: Som 4 Ric II

C 44/12/1 Parties: Rex v St John Subject: Manor of East LuccombeCounty: Som 7 Ric II

C 44/13/5 Parties: St John v Earl of Nottingham Subject: Manor of EastLuccombe & advowsons of East Luccombe & Syllyworthy County: Som 8 RicII

An extra bit of data about this Luccombe family can now be found
through Google Book Search. From the 'Nomina Villarum' of Somerset, 16Edward III - P. 36:

'Hund: de Caringtone (Carhampton)

Loccome. Item Hugo de Loccome tenet iiij. feodum de Henrico de Pinkeny,et idem Henricus de Rege, set non fit mentio per quod servicium, &c.'

The St John/Luccombe connection is also mentioned in passing in 'TheRegisters of Walter Giffard, Bishop of Bath and Wells, 1265-1266, and
of Henry Bowett, Bishop of Bath and Wells, 1401-1407', at the end under'Notes on Bowet's Register' (P. 93):

'108. For the St. John's of Luccombe, cf. Collinson, ii.,23. Elizabethde Luccombe married Oliver de St. John, the father of Henry, and
brought this manor with her.' (this last statement is wrong, Oliver and Henry were brothers) 
St. John, Lord of Instow & East Luccombe Alexander Knight, of Instow, Devon, England, UK (SSH0009)
 
16 (alias Robert ab William) Mathew, Robert (I105068759)
 
17 (alias Robert Mathew) Mathew, Robert ap Mathew (I105057257)
 
18 (alias William Mathew) Mathew, William ap Robert (I105066304)
 
19 (Mary's Twin) Reynolds, William (I8401)
 
20 ******************************************************************************
DEATH SUMMONS, MRS. ALCIE JANE (WOODS) ST.JOHN
McMinnville, Tenn. (1941)
Mrs. Alcie Jane St. John died at her home in McMinnville on July 10. She was the wife of the late Joseph Abner (Jo Ab) St. John. Mrs. St. John was the daughter of the late Nathan Lafayette and Margaret Phillips Woods of near Woodbury. She was a member of the Church of Christ and was 71 years of age. She had suffered from high blood pressure for several years but had been able to do her housework until the day of her unexpected death. The end came quietly and was a fitting climax to the quiet, modest, unassuming life she had lived. She was carried to Pleasant Knoll, a church established by her husband many years ago in Coffee County, Tenn., where W. P. Willis conducted the funeral. She was laid to rest by her husband in Morrison cemetery. The crowd attending and the beautiful florals attested to the love and esteem in which Mrs. St. John was held. She is survived by five sons; Tom and Robert St. John of Murfreesboro, Charles and Goodloe St. John of McMinnville, and Delter St.John of Morrison, Tenn. Five daughters; Mrs. Tom (Jodie) Brown of Beech Grove, Tenn. and Mrs. H. B. (Sally) Ramsey of Sainsville, both are communities of Coffee County, Tenn., Mrs. John (Medie) Prater of Morrison, Tenn., Mrs. Roy Newby (Theonia Ruth) Newby and Miss Maymie St. John of McMinnville, Tenn. She is also survived by two sisters; Mrs. Lulie Walker of Decherd, Tenn., and Mrs. Levater Higdon of Murfreesboro, Tenn., also several grandchildren and great-grandchildren survive. She was preceded in death by one daughter, Mrs. Jim (Margaret) Prater.
***************************************************************************** 
Woods, Alcie Jane (I12332)
 
21 1. ALICE ST. JOHN, I11751 Alleged Daughter Thomas, Raoul, Rodulf, Esperleng married Richard de Mont and had a son, Gilbert de Mont, aged 15 years in 1185 and his younger brother Philip de Mont. Domesday Descendants incorrectly names "Richard de Monte (Mont-Saint-Michel) and Alice, sister of John of St John" as the parents of Gilbert de Monte. The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records that “heres Gilberti de Monte…xv annorum” was "nepos [grandson, nephew, or descendant of] Thome de Sancto Johanne et Johannis de Sancto Johanne et Hugonis de Plugenet et Willelmi Fossard". (Note: Based on the birth year of her son, it seems unreasonable that Alice could be the sister to Thomas and John in the previous generation. It seems more reasonable she is the daughter of Thomas. Another possibility is that Alice is the child of Thomas and her husband, Richard is actually Richard St. John son of John St. John, Thomas’ brother and the other two men listed (Hugh Plugenet and William Fossard) could represent the maternal fathers for Thomas and John’s wives. A William Fossard was living circa 1150 and was documented in charter 502: Confirmation of foundation of Watton Priory, co. York. A Hugh Plantagenet was the son of Henry Plantagent (1133-1189: Henry II of England) and Eleanor Aquitaine. Another Hugh Plantagenet or Hugh of Wells and sometimes known as Hugh Troteman was the son of Edward of Wells.  St. John, Alice (I11751)
 
22 1. Richard Seymour
1. RICHARD1 SEYMOUR, founder of the Connecticut family of the name, was baptized at Sawbridgeworth, co. Herts, England, 27 Jan. 1604/5, the son of Robert and Elizabeth (Waller) and the grandson of John and Dyzory (Porter), and died at Norwalk, Conn., between 29 July 1655, the date of his will, and 10 Oct. 1655, the date of the inventory of his estate. He married at Sawbridgeworth, 18 Apr. 1631, MERCY RUSCOE, born about 1610, daughter of Roger and Sarah of Sawbridgeworth. She married secondly, 25 Nov. 1655, as his second wife, John Steele of Farmington, Conn., who died there 27 Feb. 1664/5.

Richard Seymour came to this country in or slightly before 1639, bringing with him his wife Mercy Ruscoe, to whom he was married at Sawbridgeworth, Hertfordshire, and their son Thomas, whose baptismal record was entered in the parish registers of Sawbridgeworth. It was this eldest son Thomas who sealed his will in 1712 with the wings of the ancient family of the Seymours of Penhow.

Richard Seymour, though not an original proprietor, was one of the early settlers of Hartford. Just when he joined the little settlement near “Dutch Point” on the Connecticut river we do not know, but probably in 1639, when we find his name in the list of those “inhabitants who were granted lotts to have only at the town's courtesie with liberty to fetch woode and keep swine or coues on the common.” His lot was No. 70, on the north side, near the “cow pasture.” His house stood on what is now North Main street, near the Ely place. He also owned outlying pieces of land including a portion of the tract running westward from the bluffs of the Trinity College property to what is now West Hartford. In 1647 he was elected chimney-viewer, which calls to mind that the houses of the first settlers were thatched, as in the old England they had left behind them, and on that account were particularly exposed to fire loss, and all the more because built of wood rather than of masonry as most of the corresponding English houses of the period were. Richard's duties, then, as chimney-viewer, were allied to those of a building inspector and fire chief of our time.

The fact that Richard received an allotment of land by the “courtesey of the town” shows that, with his family, he was judged to be an acceptable addition to the group of settlers forming the original proprietors, but his status was not equal to theirs, inasmuch as they were entitled, as he was not, to their proportional shares of the extensive areas of land held in common. Thus, every original proprietor might hope to secure as of right farm land for his sons. No such opportunity was open to settlers who were landholders by the “courtesey of the town.” This situation may account for Richard's decision to cast his lot with the planters of Norwalk under Roger Ludlow. Whatever the reason (and doubtless there were many), Richard and his former Sawbridgeworth neighbors, the Ruscoes, removed about 1650 (perhaps a year or so later) to Norwalk, where he had the status of an original proprietor of the new plantation, in the allotment of which he had a most favorable location.

We find his name among the number who made the agreement with Captain Patrick and the brilliant and restless Roger Ludlow “for the settlinge and plantinge of Norwalke,” 19 June 1650. As one of the planters of Norwalk, Richard Seymour's name appears in the indenture dated 15 Feb. 1651, between the Planters and Runckinheage and other Indians. The exact date of his removal from Hartford to Norwalk cannot be fixed, but he had undoubtedly taken up his residence there before the end of 1652, and perhaps earlier. His home-lot was well-situated, directly opposite the meeting house and Parade Ground, and on the highway leading from Stamford to Fairfield. His house was only a short distance from the present roadbed of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad. Many of his descendants have probably unconsciously viewed the spot where their ancestor lived, while being carried past the place in a manner of which he never dreamed. In the new plantation of Norwalk, Richard's abilities were fully recognized. On 29 Mar. 1655, he was elected townsman, or selectman, as we should now say. But Richard did not live to hold this office long, since in his will, which he executed 29 July 1655, he is described “very week & sike.”

It is significant, on the social side of the picture, that Richard's son Thomas was married after the arrival of the family in Norwalk, to Hannah Marvin, the sixteen year old daughter of Matthew Marvin, Sr., “one of the most distinguished of the Norwalk fathers,” who had also removed to Norwalk with his family from Hartford, where our Thomas and his Hannah had doubtless been acquainted. Matthew Marvin, Sr., was born in England in 1600 and died in Norwalk in 1680. On coming to Norwalk (he had, as well as Richard Seymour, signed the Agreement with Ludlow) Marvin was assigned to what might be regarded as the “home-lot (No. 10) of honor” in the social system of the day, i.e., the lot next to the meetinghouse, and his estate was the second largest of the Norwalk settlers. To Richard Seymour was assigned a scarcely less desirable and honorable home-lot (No. 11) of four acres facing the “Town Street” and opposite the Parade Ground, a corner lot, and near lot No. 10 assigned to Matthew Marvin, Sr. So Thomas and Hannah, even before their marriage, were near neighbors in Norwalk.

It thus appears that Richard and his family were well placed in Norwalk. On 29 March 1655, he was chosen one of the two townsmen, as we have seen. He was now about fifty years old, in the full tide of life, with a family of four boys, and one of the chief figures in the community. What was it that overtook him then? No record, alas, answers this question. All that we know is that at the end of July of this year he was “very week & sike” and making his will, which he was unable to sign save by a mark. In this brief document he refers twice to “my loving wife Mercy” and once to “my loving wife,” suggesting at least a happy relationship to his wife, to whom he had been married twenty-four years before, in Sawbridgeworth in Old England. The original will, after being duly recorded, was doubtless returned to his executors, as was the custom of the time; it has long since disappeared. The record book in which the will was copied had a quantity of ink spilled upon it, and so it happened that the copy of the will, with many others, was made in part unreadable. Did Richard, in executing his will, use the seal used by his eldest son, Thomas, in executing his will in 1712? The will itself seemingly answers the question in the negative in its concluding words, viz., “to this my will and Testament I have set my hand this 29th July 1655.” The common language, “my hand and seal,” is here contracted to “my hand.” In a time of stress such as that under which the will was drawn, the common phrasing “hand and seal” may have been contracted to hand, so the omission of “and seal” is by no means conclusive evidence that Richard's mark on his will was not supplemented by a seal. One of the two witnesses to the will was John Ruscoe, a faithful friend over many years, of England, of Hartford, of Norwalk, probably a cousin of his “loving wife Mercy,” born a Ruscoe. The date of Richard's untimely death is not known, but it seems reasonable to suppose that it took place soon after the execution of his will, 29 July 1655, when he was “very week & sike” and unable to do more than make his mark upon it.

His estate, inventoried 10 Oct. 1655, was valued at £255-09-00 - not a large, but a fair estate. Considering that Richard died at the age of about fifty years and the circumstances of his short life, the value of his estate is well above the majority of estates inventoried in 1655 or thereabout. The inventory was recorded in the same volume as his will and met with the same disaster of an overflow of ink and its top section is illegible. The only item worthy of note is “bookes” valued at £1. Comparatively few inventories of the period list any books at all. The use of the plural shows that at least there was something more than a Bible in the house. Indeed, the sum of one pound in 1655 indicates that Richard had several books, and inferentially that he could both read and write.

The next chapter in our history opens with the surprising record at Farmington of the marriage on 25 Nov. 1655, of the widow to the Hon. John Steele, who recorded the marriage in his own hand. But this does not show that the marriage took place in Farmington, rather than in Norwalk, where Mercy lived. It was very common then for the man to record his marriage where he lived, for obvious reasons connected with inheritance. The apparent precipitancy of the marriage of Richard's widow to John Steele may be remarked upon here. Steele undoubtedly knew Richard Seymour and his wife and family before they removed to Norwalk a few years earlier. Mercy, the widow, was no longer young, she had but moderate means and had four sons, of whom three were minors. She was no great “catch,” it would seem, for one of the foremost men of the Colony. Must she not have been uncommonly engaging or possessed of rare qualities of mind and heart to have led the Hon. John, even in those days of dearth of available women, to marry her and bring her back from Norwalk and her Ruscoe relatives there, with her three younger sons? Can she be blamed if it be considered who he was – “his place in the sun” – to have made a “marriage of convenience,” if such it was, though we can only speculate on that matter.

John Steele was one of the eight Magistrates appointed in 1636 by the Colony of Massachusetts Bay to govern Connecticut, before that Colony had established a jurisdiction of its own. From then until 1658 he served without intermission in the General Court or Assembly, as an elected Deputy for Hartford through the year 1645, and thereafter for Farmington. For nearly twenty years he was recorder [Town Clerk] of Hartford, and served for a time in the same capacity for Farmington, after his removal to that town. His time and energies were thus largely devoted to the public service for nearly a quarter of a century. The young Seymours, under his tutelage, must have met many of the leading men of the colony, and have acquired a considerable knowledge of public affairs.

Mercy's remarriage seems to have been a happy one. The date of her death is not known, but she survived her able and distinguished husband, who died 27 Feb. 1664/5. In his will, dated 30 Jan. 1664, he bequeathed to his “dear and loving wife Mercy Steele the house wherein I now dwell and the appurtenances belonging to it.”.

On Mercy's marriage to the Hon. John Steele, her three minor children, John, Zachariah and Richard, became members of his household in Farmington. They could hardly have been better placed in any Connecticut household of the time. It is a pleasure to record that the interests of Richard Seymour's minor children were safeguarded. We quote from Selleck's “Norwalk,” p. 154:

Richard Seymour1st. executed his will July 29, 1655, and died within the next three months. He had appointed his wife and his “faithful friend” Richard Olmsted administrators, leaving everything to his aforementioned children, and commissioning his wife to take charge of the estates of the three younger boys “until such time as they shall be fit to receive and dispose of” the same. Mrs. Steele sought the welfare of her Seymour offspring, as did also her second husband. On Oct. 13,1) 1668, thirteen years after the decease of Mr. Seymour and four years after that of Mr. Steele, the three lads, now arrived at majority, were paid the “full and just” amount due them, and acknowledged before Samuel Steele and their brother Thomas that they were “fully satisfied.” From the first [John] of this trio of youths, bereft at an age when they most needed it, of a father's counsel, but still judiciously cared for, have descended well-known New England and New York families.

The mutilated first volume of Fairfield Probate Records (page 6) contains the recorded copy of Richard Seymour's will; the original is not in the files. We have no autograph of Richard Seymour and hence we do not know his own spelling of his name. The surname is diversely spelled in various records pertaining to him and his sons, but in those days spelling was largely phonetic and hence the spelling employed by the early scribes is not significant. By the time of his grandsons, the standard spelling of the name seems to have been generally accepted.

[The will of Richar]d Semer (1655)
[ ] being very week & sike [ ] gods pon[?]
mercy in [ ] doe leve this as my [ ] doe first
will and [ ] dust of weh it was [made and my soul into the]
hands of God that gave it [and I doe will and] bequeath unto my Loving wife
Mercy [Seamor] my whole Estate: viz: my house & Lands Cattle and [all]
my moveables: Except that it is my Will that [my] Eldest sonn Thomas should
have two steeres [ ] year old and upward and my best cartt:
thease [to] receive soen after my decease:

It is alsoe my will that my other three sons John & Zachary [and] Richard
receive out of this Totall estate the sum of forty pounds each of them viz:
fourty pounds to John and fourty pounds to Zachary and forty pounds to
Richard: duly and faythiully to be payd to them severally at the age of twenty-
one years: Unles the Executors of this my Will shall see cause to doe it soener:
It is alsoe my Will that my loving wife should have the dispose of my three
sons John Zachary & Richard untill such time as they shall be fit to receive and
dispose of ther Estate: It is alsoe my will and apoyntment that my loving Wife
Mercy: togather with my faythfull freind Richard Olmsted be the sole Executors
and Administrators of this my Last Will and Testament the aforesaid Legasies
and all Lawfull debts and demands duly discharged by my loving wife Mercy:
It is my will that shee posses and enioy all the rest of my Estate. to this my
will and Testament I have set to my hand this 29th July 1655:

In the presence of us
Thomas Handford the marke of Richard f Seamer
Jno Rescoe

25 octobar 1655
The Court haveing examined the will of Richard Seamor they doe approve
therof

William Hill: Secretary

The top section of the inventory also has suffered and is partly illegible.

Anno Dom[ini]
1655
Octobr 10[th]
Imprim[is]
[— —]
[— —]
In w[earing apparel] [08-05-00]
In Chest[s, wooden ware and] other mov[eables] [06-05-00]
In Iron Tools and nayles [03-02-00]
In hempe and flaxe [02-10-00]
In butter and cheese [02-10-00]
In a Cart plowe & dr[ag]get tackling [05]-03-00
In Corn [16-02-00]
In hay [08-00-00]
In oxen [33-00-00]
In Cowes and Calves [35-00-00]
In steeres and heifers [21-00-00]
In a mare and fole & a yong hors [28-00-00]
In sort hoggs [17-00-00]
In smaller hoggs and Piggs [20-05-00]
In debts [11-00-00]
In bookes [01-00-00]
In armes and ammunition [03-02-00]
—-
Totall [255-09-00]
Apprised by us Mathew Campfeild Richard Olmsteed 25 Octobr 1655 William Hill Secretary

The Court haveing examined this Inventory of Richard Seamors they doe approve therof.

The receipt of the three younger sons reads as follows [Fairfield Probate Records, vol. 2, p. 33] :

Octobr 30: 1668 Received by vs John Semer Zackery Semer Richard Semer of Mr John Steele deceased the full and Just sum of sixscore pounds sterling: that is to say forty pounds each of vs vpon the Aco of ye legasies due to vs by the last will of or Honored father Richard Semer deceased and we doe acknowledg that it is a full and compleat acomplishment of ye aforesaid will Respecting our selues and doe by these presents fully wholy compleatly acquit and discharge ye aforsaid Steele and alsoe ye Executor and ye Executrix of ye estate of ye aforesaid Semer all and every of them ther heirs Executors Administrators and assignes from any or all demands from or by our selues our heirs Executors Administrators & assignes respecting the premises or from any person from by or vnder vs aknowlidging that we are fully satisiyed as aforesaid and doe by these prsents wholly discharge ye aforesaid persons respecting ye prmises - as witnes or hands

Witnes hearof Zackery Semer
Samuell Steele Richard Semer
Tho: Semer John Semer
This is a True Coppy acording to ye origenall Transcribed p me Willm Hill Clarke

That the four sons of Richard Seymour made a place for themselves in their respective communities, may be gauged by the fact that their combined inventories at death amounted to well over £2,000, which of course makes no allowance for property bestowed on the children of some of them before they died. 
Seymour (Seamer), Richard (SSH2236)
 
23 13 Aug 1678 James St John, of Cheapside, London, Citizen & Goldsmith, Bachr, abt 29, & Sarah Griffith, of St Helen's, London, Spr, abt 24, at her own dispose, her parents dead; at All Hallows in the Wall, London.

Collection:
Kent: Canterbury - Marriage Licence allegations, Dean of Westminster, 1558-1699 and Vicar-General of the Archbishop of Canterbury, 1660 to 1679 (Marriage) 
Family F3498
 
24 1335
Reference: C 135/45/8
Description:
Elizabeth, sister and heir of John, son and heir of Hugh de Luccombe, who died in the King's wardship: Devon (proof of age)
Date: 9 Edward III
Held by: The National Archives, Kew
Legal status: Public Record 
de Luccombe, John (I104783200)
 
25 1391 May 2 annuity cause

1391 June 12 cause vacated by surrender and cancelled, because the king granted the above annuity to John Seynt John, knight, and Isabella his wife, in survivorship, 12 June, in his eighteenth year.

Source:
Calendar of the Patent Rolls: Henry III, 1216,1272. 6v. 1901-1913

https://books.google.com/books?id=OB_vAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA402&lpg=PA402&dq=Dioces+of+Exeter+%22Seynt+John%22&source=bl&ots=mko-lzGa0s&sig=oCIMIhoEI9EfoVr6VjA9AU79F5o&hl=en&sa=X&ei=iL-8VPaGLdanyASbjIKYAg&ved=0CCAQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=Dioces%20of%20Exeter%20%22Seynt%20John%22&f=false 
de Port-St. John, John of Fonmon (I104783183)
 
26 1391 May 2 annuity cause

1391 June 12 cause vacated by surrender and cancelled, because the king granted the above annuity to John Seynt John, knight, and Isabella his wife, in survivorship, 12 June, in his eighteenth year. 
Family F4420
 
27 14 Jan 1543, Clifton, Bedfordshire, England: Complete Peerage vol. 11, George Edward Cokayne (editor), (Date: 1949;), page 334. Family F3728
 
28 14-21 Page boys could become Squires. King James reigned in 1603. Oliver was probably born between 1582-1589 as the youngest son. St. John, Captain Oliver Esq. (I104783160)
 
29 1820 Census says aged 26-40 yrs old. So she was born between 1780-1794.

She married in 1803, aged probably at least 15 so born before 1788 
St. John, Catherine Dobbins (SSH2752)
 
30 1848 named in Father's probate records
1850 appears in Federal Census
No 1860 Federal Census found 
St. John, Arthur (OSA5006)
 
31 1900 Federal Census includes an O'Neill family just a few entries before listings of the St. John families.  St. John, John (I105550472)
 
32 1900 Federal Census states Apr 1824

Name John St John
Age 76
Birth Date Apr 1824
Birthplace Ireland
Home in 1900 Silver Ridge Plantation, Aroostook, Maine
Race White
Gender Male
Immigration Year 1848
Relation to Head of House Head
Marital Status Married
Spouse's Name Mary S St John
Marriage Year 1851
Years Married 49
Father's Birthplace Ireland
Mother's Birthplace Ireland
Household Members
Name Age
John St John 76
Mary S St John 65
Patrick H St John 48 
St. John, John (I105550472)
 
33 23 Sep 1792 is the date given by Orline Alexander. It is apparently documented as wrong so should be investigated to see who instead it applies to.

John St. John and Anna Lockwood Family Bible uses 29 Oct 1792 as well as other info provided by Merridee Clemons 
St. John, Seth (OSA0559)
 
34 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. St. John, M.P. (I105550455)
 
35 381 i James, b. Sept. 16, 1782; d. in Philadelphia, Feb. 20, 1815, ae. 32 (T. S.). Benoni signed voucher for college dues at Yale for James St. John, Oct. 22, 1801.  St. John, James (OSA0381)
 
36 6087a Isaac St. John, m. Betsey; she was administratrix, 1786 (Goodwin's Va. Colonial Rec, p. 66). Orline Alexander, 1907 pg. 534 The St. John Genealogy St. John, Isaac (OSA6087A)
 
37 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Private (I105)
 
38 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Private (I104)
 
39 Mr. St. John murdered in murder-suicide by a man named Sapher 1870

Not sure if this article pertains to this man but it 'fits' date and location? 
St. John, Charles M.D. (OSA4097)
 
40 Henry Jefferson St. John - Brother to my GG Grandfather, George Richard St. John St. John, Captain Henry Jefferson Attorney at Law (SSH2264)
 
41

Obituary Transcript



Anderson Daily Bulletin
(Anderson, Indiana)
28 Sep 1953, Mon • Page 22

CHARLES ST. JOHN


Funeral services for Charles E. St. John, 86, 70 Ruddle Ave., who died on arrival at St. John's Hospital Saturday afternoon at 1 o'clock, will be held Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock at Baker Brothers Funeral Home.


Burial will be in South Park Cemetery at Greensburg, Ind. Friends will be received by the family today after 3 p.m. at the funeral home.


A native of Greensburg, the deceased came to Anderson 40 years ago. He was a carpenter by trade and had been retired the past few years.


Survivors include: two daughters, Miss Hazel St. John, with whom he resided, and Miss Nadine St. John, Anderson; two sons, E. L. St. John, Muncie, and W.S. St. John, residing in Wisconsin; two sisters, Mrs. Ethel Meckel, Anderson; Miss Anna St. John, also of Anderson, and 10 grandchildren.

 
St. John, Charles Elton (I87)
 
42 Found on Newspapers.com St. John, James Jacob I (I100)
 
43 Found on Newspapers.com St. John, Mary Sucille (I99)
 
44 Found on Newspapers.com Borror, Forrest Eugene (I1308)
 
45 Found on Newspapers.com St. John, Charles Elton (I87)
 
46 Found on Newspapers.com St. John, Nadine Levina (I94)
 
47 Found on Newspapers.com St. John, Mathias (OSA0109)
 
48 Found on Newspapers.com St. John, Samuel (OSA0301)
 
49 Found on Newspapers.com St. John, Samuel L (SSH12427)
 
50 ?The names of all that have been examined, since the first of January last, and now sent unto the lords of the Privy Council.?
Endorsed by Cecil :??Examinations concerning Sir Ch. and Sir H. Danvers.? (170. 91.)
The examinations of the persons named, viz.:?
(1.) Anthony Swaine, one of the soldiers of Calshot Castle : taken before Edward, Earl of Hertford, Sir Thomas West, Knt., and William St. John, Esquire, 4th January 1594.
Swaine, Kitche and Mandy, soldiers of the Castle, were at Calshot on Monday the 7th of October last, when John Dalamor, the water serjeant, came thither and gave warning to Kitche, the master gunner that there were many suspected persons in the boat that rode between St. Andrews and Calshot, and willed them bend their ordnance against them. Mr. Humminges came on the same morning in a boat to the Castle to the Deputy to know if he had received any letters from the Captain, and presently after, the Deputy went to Hampton, and came not again until Wednesday night, after the coming of the company to the Castle.
On the 9th, about four of the clock in the afternoon, he heard a shot from St. Andrews Castle, even as a boat came on shore at Calshot Castle, which was of Itchen Ferry, out of the which came four or five persons, whereof the two knights, Sir Charles and Sir Henry Danvers, and Mr. Dymmocke were three. Presently came in another greater boat ten or eleven persons more ashore to the Castle, but he knew none of them. Mr. Dymmocke, presently after his coming, had some speech with Kitche, but what the speech was, he knoweth not; after the speech Kitche took all the said company into the Castle, disarmed them, arrested them and put them all up into the Deputy's chamber, and guarded the Castle with such weapons as there were, until the help came out of the company, which they sent for, viz : John Coles, John Gouldoke, John Hancocke, and Thomas Locke, who came into the Castle within an hour and a half after the said company. The Deputy came from Hampton into the Castle after 5 o'clock the same night, and finding all things as aforesaid, willed the said company to depart, and told them that they in the Castle were the Captain's friends, and were going into Brittany for service, and that he would keep the said help harmless, and keep them from trouble, and see the company in the Castle forthcoming. And the knights, Dymmocke, and the Deputy, with the rest of the company, did sup in the Deputy's Chamber, with such victuals as they brought with them, viz.: beef, mutton, and cold pasty of venison, and this examinate going and coming amongst them, did perceive the said knights to be very sad. He remembered that Roger Fynche, the porter, came from Hampton the 10th of October, and went back again that night. During their being in the Castle, the lesser knight, whose name was Sir Charles Danvers, as he thinketh, was hurt in one of his hands, and he saw one of their men, a surgeon, being a little man and young, on the said Thursday night dress the said knight's hurt. He saw not any of the company on Friday till towards night that they departed from the Castle, which was about 4 of the clock in the afternoon, and was presently on the coming of one Gilbert, a Scottishman, in a boat that came from Hamble. Their departure was very sudden; Mr. Dymmocke went with them also, but Gilbert went not with them because the boat was overloaden, who went overland from thence. They went into the boat in such haste that they were like to sink it. The said Gilbert told him that one Mr. Payne, a man of my lord of Southampton's, at such time as Gilbert took boat to come towards Calshot willed him to tell the knights that they should presently be gone and shift for themselves or else they would be apprehended that night, upon which message delivered they all departed suddenly, in a great hurly burly.
Signed : Hertford. Thomas West. William Seint John.
Endorsed with a précis of the contents.
2 pp. (170. 81.) 
St. John, Vice Admiral Sir William Knight (SSH0007)
 

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